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Can anyone explain what I'm doing wrong here to not get 11 as my output?

void foo {
    int *n = malloc(sizeof(int)); 
    *n = 10; 
    n++;
    printf("%d", *n)
}
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8  
you're also leaking the pointer. –  Stephen Jun 19 '10 at 2:06
    
@Stephen, not only leaking the pointer but doing it in a sort of interesting way. :) –  BobbyShaftoe Jun 19 '10 at 4:29
1  
Well, n++ is defined as it's just past the end of an allocated object, so you could do n-- and get the pointer back. –  Artelius Jun 20 '10 at 7:37
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5 Answers

up vote 25 down vote accepted

n++ increments the pointer n, not the integer pointed to by n. To increment the integer, you need to dereference the pointer and then increment the result of that:

(*n)++;
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Suggest you change the wording slightly: "To dereference the integer" -> "To increment the integer" –  Matt Curtis Jun 19 '10 at 2:15
2  
@Matt: Yes; I just saw that. There must have been a bus error between my brain and fingers. :-) Thanks. –  James McNellis Jun 19 '10 at 2:15
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If we call the malloc'ed variable x, then your program does this:

                                      n     x
int *n = malloc(sizeof(int));        &x     ?
*n = 10;                             &x    10
n++;                                &x+1   10

You want to do this:

                                      n     x
int *n = malloc(sizeof(int));        &x     ?
*n = 10;                             &x    10
(*n)++;                              &x    11
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1  
++ has higher precedence than the unary *, so parentheses are needed in order to perform the dereference before the increment. –  James McNellis Jun 19 '10 at 1:58
1  
@James: K&R says the same precedence, but associativity right-to-left, so parentheses still needed. –  dmckee Jun 19 '10 at 2:02
    
Of course it is. Edit reflects this. –  Artelius Jun 19 '10 at 2:02
    
@dmckee: The postfix ++ has higher precedence than both the prefix ++ and unary * (the prefix ++ and unary * have the same precedence, as you say). –  James McNellis Jun 19 '10 at 2:06
1  
+1 for the nice illustration –  Matt Curtis Jun 19 '10 at 2:14
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You set n[0] to 10, and then you print n[1]. malloc() does not initialize the memory that it gives you, so what gets printed is unpredictable - it's whatever garbage happened to be in n[1].

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Except, of course, that there is no n[1], so you are reading from beyond the end of the allocated memory, the behavior of which is undefined. –  James McNellis Jun 19 '10 at 2:53
    
Absolutely right! I hadn't noticed that he used malloc to allocate a single int. –  rettops Jun 19 '10 at 3:25
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You can get 11 as your output with this code:

void foo {
    int *n = malloc(sizeof(int)); 
    *n = 10; 
    (*n)++; 
    printf("%d", *n)
}
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n++ moves the pointer sizeof(int) bytes forward.

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yes...I realized and edited :) –  Jason Jun 19 '10 at 3:28
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