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We currently run a big subversion repository, and I'm trying to move it to GIT. The problem is that it uses trunks and tags below the root directory. For example:

MyDepartment\MyOS\Project1\trunk\              <-- master branch
MyDepartment\MyOS\Project1\branch\v1           <-- other branch
MyDepartment\MyOS\Project1\tags\v1_20100101    <-- release tag

There are different departments, OS's, and many different projects.

So when I clone the SVN repository using --stdlayout:

git svn clone --stdlayout http://svn-repository/

The clone ends up empty. Without the option, I get a clone, but then branches are treated as directories on the master branch.

  1. Is there a way to import this directory structure in one go?
  2. If I write a script to import all the Projects separately, is there a way to combine the per-project GIT imports into one big GIT repository?
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1  
--stdlayout assumes trunk, tags, branch**es**. –  J.F. Sebastian Jun 19 '10 at 14:17

2 Answers 2

Look into Git submodules. You'll probably have to import each of your subprojects separately, but the result may mirror your current usage a little better.

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Unfortunately, the book I read ("Version Control with Git") discourages the use of submodules in a rather convincing way –  Andomar Jun 19 '10 at 16:56

If I understande the question correctly, you want:

git svn clone 
    --trunk=MyDepartment\MyOS\Project1\trunk 
    --tags=MyDepartment\MyOS\Project1\tags 
    --branches=MyDepartment\MyOS\Project1\branch 
    http://svn-repository/

Update: you can include more then one --branches and --tags:

git svn clone 
    --trunk=MyDepartment\MyOS\Project1\trunk 
    --tags=MyDepartment\MyOS\Project1\tags 
    --tags=MyDepartment\MyOS\Project2\tags 
    --tags=OtherDepatment\MyOS\Project1\tags 
    --branches=MyDepartment\MyOS\Project1\branch 
    --branches=MyDepartment\MyOS\Project2\branch 
    --branches=OtherDepartment\MyOS\Project1\branch 
    http://svn-repository/

You cannot have more the one trunk evidently.

Git is really designed to support one project per one repository and not multiple projects in one repo. I suppose you will hit many problems trying to use it like that.

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There are many different projects. I can script the import for each project, but how can I combine them into one git repository? –  Andomar Jun 20 '10 at 16:07
    
Small update about multiple branches and tags parameters. Does this help? Or you want git to automagically guess the complex structure of your repository? I believe it is not possible. –  silk Jun 21 '10 at 9:32
    
Is it possible to merge multiple git repositories into one? –  Andomar Jun 21 '10 at 20:29

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