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Relatively new to rails and trying to model a very simple family "tree" with a single Person model that has a name, gender, father_id and mother_id (2 parents). Below is basically what I want to do, but obviously I can't repeat the :children in a has_many (the first gets overwritten).

class Person < ActiveRecord::Base
  belongs_to :father, :class_name => 'Person'
  belongs_to :mother, :class_name => 'Person'
  has_many :children, :class_name => 'Person', :foreign_key => 'mother_id'
  has_many :children, :class_name => 'Person', :foreign_key => 'father_id'
end

Is there a simple way to use has_many with 2 foreign keys, or maybe change the foreign key based on the object's gender? Or is there another/better way altogether?

Thanks!

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For Rails 3, scope chainning, ActiveRecord::Relation and eventually has_many: stackoverflow.com/questions/17476521/… –  MrYoshiji Jul 4 '13 at 19:02
    
You are looking for "composit keys": stackoverflow.com/questions/17882105/… –  xpepermint Feb 27 at 12:53

5 Answers 5

up vote 29 down vote accepted

Found a simple answer on IRC that seems to work (thanks to Radar):

class Person < ActiveRecord::Base
  belongs_to :father, :class_name => 'Person'
  belongs_to :mother, :class_name => 'Person'
  has_many :children_of_father, :class_name => 'Person', :foreign_key => 'father_id'
  has_many :children_of_mother, :class_name => 'Person', :foreign_key => 'mother_id'
  def children
     children_of_mother + children_of_father
  end
end
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13  
but #children return an Array... –  Fro_oo Nov 24 '11 at 21:28
1  
If there are any default scopes, in particular, those which might affect the order of the results, this solution will not work as the results will not be ordered as expected. –  mgadda Aug 9 '12 at 17:54
    
It works. thanks! –  Abram Oct 1 '13 at 23:14
    
you can get an ActiveRecord:Relation by defining #children like I did in my answer below –  mr.musicman Aug 16 at 18:11

I believe you can achieve the relationships you want using :has_one.

class Person < ActiveRecord::Base
  has_one :father, :class_name => 'Person', :foreign_key => 'father_id'
  has_one :mother, :class_name => 'Person', :foreign_key => 'mother_id'
  has_many :children, :class_name => 'Person'
end

I'll confirm and edit this answer after work ; )

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This didn't work for me... seemed to good to be true, but I got the expected erorr for the has_many relationship: 'no column named person_id in table people. –  deivid Feb 21 at 10:48

Used named_scopes over the Person model do this:

class Person < ActiveRecord::Base

    def children
      Person.with_parent(id)
    end

    named_scope :with_parent, lambda{ |pid| 

       { :conditions=>["father_id = ? or mother_id=?", pid, pid]}
    }
 end
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I prefer to use scopes for this issue. Like this:

class Person < ActiveRecord::Base
  belongs_to :father, :class_name => 'Person'
  belongs_to :mother, :class_name => 'Person'
  has_many :children_of_father, :class_name => 'Person', :foreign_key => 'father_id'
  has_many :children_of_mother, :class_name => 'Person', :foreign_key => 'mother_id'

  scope :children_for, lambda {|father_id, mother_id| where('father_id = ? AND mother_id = ?', father_id, mother_id) }
end

This trick make it easy to get children without use instances:

Person.children_for father_id, mother_id
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To improve on Kenzie's answer, you can achieve an ActiveRecord Relation by defining Person#children like:

def children
   children_of_mother.merge(children_of_father)
end

see this answer for more details

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