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An interviewer recently asked me this question: given three boolean variables, a, b, and c, return true if at least two out of the three are true.

My solution follows:

boolean atLeastTwo(boolean a, boolean b, boolean c) {
    if ((a && b) || (b && c) || (a && c)) {
        return true;
    }
    else{
        return false;
    }
}

He said that this can be improved further, but how?

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144  
Inline the return statement. –  Finglas Jun 19 '10 at 15:48
27  
Sounds like a "who-has-the-highest-IQ" interview. I would fail. –  Chris Dutrow Jun 19 '10 at 23:23
64  
atLeastTwo(iWantYou, iNeedYou, imEverGonnaLoveYou) –  Andrew Grimm Jun 20 '10 at 7:44
78  
Why do people upvote the most trivial questions? –  BlueRaja - Danny Pflughoeft Jun 22 '10 at 16:45
22  
Questions that are general and easy to understand get a lot of up votes. Questions that are very specific and technical don't. –  Jay Jun 23 '10 at 17:37
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59 Answers 59

My first thought when I saw the question was:

int count=0;
if (a)
    ++count;
if (b)
    ++count;
if (c)
    ++count;
return count>=2;

After seeing other posts, I admit that

return (a?1:0)+(b?1:0)+(c?1:0)>=2;

is much more elegant. I wonder what the relative runtimes are.

In any case, though, I think this sort of solution is much better than a solution of the

return a&b | b&c | a&c;

variety because is is more easily extensible. What if later we add a fourth variable that must be tested? What if the number of variables is determined at runtime, and we are passed an array of booleans of unknown size? A solution that depends on counting is much easier to extend than a solution that depends on listing every possible combination. Also, when listing all possible combinations, I suspect that it is much easier to make a mistake. Like try writing the code for "any 3 of 4" and make sure you neither miss any nor duplicate any. Now try it with "any 5 of 7".

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It should be:

(a || b && c) && (b || c && a)

Also, if true is automatically converted to 1 and false to 0:

(a + b*c) * (b + c*a) > 0
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How about (a||b) && (a||c) - Java, uses three comparisons instead of the OP's six.

Wrong, I should have checked earlier.

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Since it wasn't specified how the code should be improved, I shall endeavour to improve the code by making it more amusing. Here's my solution:

boolean atLeastTwo(boolean t, boolean f, boolean True) {
    boolean False = True;
    if ((t || f) && (True || False)) 
        return "answer" != "42";
    if (t && f) 
        return !"France".contains("Paris");
    if (False == True) 
        return true == false;
    return Math.random() > 0.5;
}

In case anyone's wondering if this code works, here's a simplification using the same logic:

boolean atLeastTwo(boolean a, boolean b, boolean c) {
    if ((a || b) && (c)) 
        return true;
    if (a && b) 
        return true;
    if (true) 
        return false;
    // The last line is a red herring, as it will never be reached:
    return Math.random() > 0.5; 

}

This can be boiled down further to the following:

return ((a || b) && (c)) || (a && b);

But now it's not funny any more.

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Ternary operators get the nerd juices flowing, but they can be confusing (making code less maintainable, thus increasing the potential for bug injection). Jeff Attwood said it well here:

It's a perfect example of trading off an utterly meaningless one time write-time savings against dozens of read-time comprehension penalties-- It Makes Me Think.

Avoiding ternary operators, I've created the following function:

function atLeastTwoTrue($a, $b, $c) {
        $count = 0;

        if ($a) { $count++; }
        if ($b) { $count++; }
        if ($c) { $count++; }

        if ($count >= 2) {
                return true;
        } else {
                return false;
        }
}

Is this as cool as some of the other solutions? No. Is it easier to understand? Yes. Will that lead to more maintainable, less buggy code? Yes.

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1  
Why not simply return ($count >= 2);? Also it's a duplicate of this answer - stackoverflow.com/questions/3076078/… –  ChrisF Jun 21 '10 at 17:21
5  
Personally I find multiple if statements Make Me Think more than ternary operators, since each if statement represents a different possible execution path. A single line, OTOH, will always set the value to the left of the equals sign exactly once, no matter how many ternary operators are used to the right of the equals sign. –  Jeremy Friesner Jun 21 '10 at 18:17
4  
I much prefer Ternary operators to multi-line stuff that I replace. I often (in legacy code) take ~10 lines down to one with a ternary. Less text = more code on screen = more context. –  Luciano Jun 21 '10 at 21:32
2  
Yeah man... it isn't just about being cool. Ternaries are shorter. Less to read, less to comprehend. Unless you really struggle with them, one little ternary is a lot quicker to understand than the... 8 lines and branching opportunities you have there. –  Mark Jun 22 '10 at 5:25
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function atLeastTwoTrue($a, $b, $c) {

  int count = 0;
  count = (a ? count + 1 : count);
  count = (b ? count + 1 : count);
  count = (c ? count + 1 : count);
  return (count >= 2);
}
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1  
Gahh... why?! The other counting methods already posted are so much better! –  Mark Jun 22 '10 at 5:21
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Definitely a question that's more about how you solve problems/think than your actual coding ability.

A slightly terser version could be

return ((a ^ b) && (b ^ c)) ^ b

But like a previous poster said, if I saw this in any code I was working on, someone would be getting an earful. :)

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X = OR(a+b,c)

a b c X

1 1 0 1

0 0 1 1

0 1 1 1

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If the goal is to return a bitwise two-out-of-three value for three operands, arithmetic and iterative approaches are apt to be relatively ineffective. On many CPU architectures, a good form would be "return ((a | b) & c) | (a & b);". That takes four boolean operations. On single-accumulator machines (common in small embedded systems) that's apt to take a total of seven instructions per byte. The form "return (a & b) | (a & c) | (b & c);" is perhaps nicer looking, but it would require five boolean operations, or nine instructions per byte on a single-accumulator machine.

Incidentally, in CMOS logic, computing "not two out of three" requires twelve transistors (for comparison, an inverter requires two, a two-input NAND or NOR requires four, and a three-input NAND or NOR requires six).

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One thing I haven't seen others point out is that a standard thing to do in the "please write me some code" section of the job interview is to say "Could you improve that?" or "Are you completely happy with that" or "is that as optimized as possible?" when you say you are done. It's possible you heard "how would you improve that" as "this might be improved; how?". In this case changing the if(x) return true; else return false; idiom to just return x is an improvement - but be aware that there are times they just want to see how you react to the question. I have heard that some interviewers will insist there is a flaw in perfect code just to see how you cope with it.

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The best answer to the question should be "As an employee, it's important I write it so that my meaning is clear while maintaining efficiency where necessary for performance." Here's how I'd write it:

function atLeastTwoAreTrue(a, b, c) {
    return (a && b) || (b && c) || (a && c);
}

In reality, the test is so contrived that writing a method that's the fastest, most cryptic possible is perfect acceptable if you accomodate it with a simple comment. But, in general, in this one-liner world, we need more readable code in this world. :-)

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FYI, this is just the carry-out bit of a full adder. In hardware, you could use the logical effort to determine the optimal circuit based on the different boolean expressions. I would guess that the traditional XOR solution would take more effort than the less succinct expression that the poster presented.

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The 2 and 3 in the question posed are decidedly magic-numberish. The 'correct' answer will depend on whether the interviewer was trying to get at your grasp of boolean logic (and I don't think pdox's answer could be bested in this respect) or your understanding of architectural issues.

I'd be inclined to go with a map-reduce solution that will accept any sort of list with any arbitrary condition.

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I found this solution.

boolean atLeastTwo(boolean a, boolean b, boolean c) {
    bool result = !(a ^ b ^ c) && !(!a & !b & !c) || (a & b & c);
    return result;
}
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Let the three boolean values be A,B and C....

You can use a k-MAP and come with a boolean expression ...

In this case boolean expression will be A(B+C) + C

or if((A && (B || C )) || C ) { return true; } else return false;

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The non-reduced solution to this problem is:

a'bc + abc' + abc + ab'c

Reducing using K-Maps, one gets:

bc + ab + ac

One could reduce this further by using exclusive or on the a'bc and abc' minterms and combining the abc and ab'c minterms:

b(a ^ c) + ac
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Not in context of performance but good code(extensible and readable code that can be reused)

     static boolean trueBooleans (int howMany,boolean ... bools)
     {
      int total = 0;

      for (boolean b:bools)
        if (b && (++total == howMany)) return true;


      return false;
    }

In my humble opinion when writing Java, easy handling unexpected changes and no duplicated code are more important than concise (domain of script languages) or fast program.

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Calculated via a truth table:

return (A and B) or 
       (c and (a ^ b))

The ^ symbol is the XOR operator.

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2  
Well, the original solution is easier. –  z-index Jun 22 '10 at 5:13
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In C#, off of the top of my head:

public bool lol(int minTrue, params bool[] bools)
{
    return bools.Count( ( b ) => b ) >= minTrue;
}

should be pretty quick.

A call would look like this:

lol( 2, true, true, false );

This way, you are leaving the rules (two must be true) up to the caller, instead of embedding them in the method.

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int count=0;

boolean atLeastTwo(boolean a, boolean b, boolean c) {
    if (a)
        count++;
    if (b)
        count++;
    if (c)
        count++;

    if (count>1)
        return true;
    else
        return false;
}
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C:

if (!!a + !!b + !!c >= 2)
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How about this one:

(a - b) ? c : a
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It seems to me that three out of three are quite arbitrary numbers, and the function should work with an arbitrary number. So in order to answer the question, I'd write a function that would work out if x in an array were true, for example,

bool istrue ( int x, bool[] list)
    y = count true in list
    return y >= x
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If I convert the booleans into a number, and if the number is not a power of two, it has at least two trues.

a*4 + b*2 + c*1 = N
return( N != 0 && (N&(N-1)) != 0)

I am just giving an alternative.

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The simplest form using ternary operators to solve the problem is:

return a ? (b ? true : c) : (b ? c : false);

You may also want to invest finding a solution by using double negation of the requirement, meaning to say, instead of at least two true values, you need to satisfy the condition at most one false value.

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Function ko returns the answer:

static int ho(bool a)
{
    return a ? 1 : 0;
}

static bool ko(bool a, bool b, bool c)
{
    return ho(a) + ho(b) + ho(c) >= 2 ? true : false;
}
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I believe using plain boolean operators (a || b) && (b || c) is fine and is simpler.

You can swap any of the 3 letters with any of the other two and it's still the same expresion.

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I think the simplest solution is:

return (a && b) || c;

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My first thought was

return (a||b)&&(b||c)

but for ease of reading I liked the proposed a+b+c>=2 solution that you guys suggested better

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6  
Your answer returns an incorrect value when a and c are false, and only b is true. –  Timothy Fries Jun 21 '10 at 22:12
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protected by yoda Jan 30 '12 at 16:35

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