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I have this snippet of the code:

void addLineRelative(LineNumber number, LineNumber relativeNumber) {
            list<shared_ptr<Line> >::iterator i;
            findLine(i, number);
            if(i == listOfLines.end()){
                throw "LineDoesNotExist";
            }

   line 15  if(dynamic_cast<shared_ptr<FamilyLine> >(*i)){
                cout << "Family Line";
            } else {
                throw "Not A Family Line";
            }
        }

I have class Line and derived from it FamilyLine and RegularLine, so I want find FamilyLine

my program fails on the line 15, I receive an error

cannot dynamic_cast target is not pointer or reference

can somebody please help, thanks in advance

edited

I tried this one:

shared_ptr<FamilyLine> ptr(dynamic_cast<shared_ptr<FamilyLine> >(*i));
if(ptr){
    //do stuff
}

the same error

edited

void addLineRelative(LineNumber number, LineNumber relativeNumber) {
        list<shared_ptr<Line> >::iterator i;
        findLine(i, number);
        if(i == listOfLines.end()){
            throw "LineDoesNotExist";
        }

        shared_ptr<FamilyLine> ptr(dynamic_pointer_cast<FamilyLine>(*i));
        if (ptr){
            cout << "Family Line";
        } else {
            throw "Not A Family Line";
        }
    }

receive this error

Multiple markers at this line
    - `dynamic_pointer_cast' was not declared in this 
     scope
    - unused variable 'dynamic_pointer_cast'
    - expected primary-expression before '>' token
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1 Answer 1

up vote 4 down vote accepted

shared_ptr does not implicitly convert to a pointer - it is a class-type object - and dynamic_cast, static_cast and const_cast all operate on pointers only.

While you could use dynamic_cast on shared_ptr<T>::get(), its better to use dynamic_pointer_cast<FamilyLine>() instead as you might otherwise accidentally introduce double-deletes:

Returns:
* When dynamic_cast<T*>(r.get()) returns a nonzero value, a shared_ptr<T> object that stores a copy of it and shares ownership with r;
* Otherwise, an empty shared_ptr<T> object.
[...]
Notes: the seemingly equivalent expression

shared_ptr<T>(dynamic_cast<T*>(r.get()))

will eventually result in undefined behavior, attempting to delete the same object twice.

E.g.:

shared_ptr<FamilyLine> ptr(dynamic_pointer_cast<FamilyLine>(*i));
if (ptr) {
    // ... do stuff with ptr
} 
share|improve this answer
1  
@hello: What version are you using, TR1 et al (use <memory>) or boost (<boost/pointer_cast.hpp>)? (Side-note: The owner of a post is always notified of comments, so the @user syntax isn't neccessary in this case) –  Georg Fritzsche Jun 19 '10 at 16:40
1  
Then you are probably using TR1 or C++0x features and #include <memory> should be sufficient. –  Georg Fritzsche Jun 19 '10 at 16:45
1  
Well, every C++ library worth its grain either has its types and functions in a namespace (like std for the standard library, boost for Boost, ...) or at least gives them a common prefix (Q for Qt). So as long as you don't have any using directives for boost anywhere but have them for std, the shared_ptr has to come from the standard library or an extension of it. This confusion is by the way a good argument against putting using namespace foo; everywhere. –  Georg Fritzsche Jun 19 '10 at 16:51
2  
Probably std - can you add what you tried to the question? –  Georg Fritzsche Jun 19 '10 at 16:53
2  
@hello: Do you have #include <memory>? Do you use any special includes (i.e. besides <memory>) for shared_ptr? –  Georg Fritzsche Jun 19 '10 at 17:00

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