Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I want to stop propagation of this div's onclick event to the document? When the user click on the "div", both alerts appear: 1) the div's alert and 2) the document's alert. I want to suppress the document alert.

I know how to do it using addEventListener, but is there another way to to do it? The problem below is that I don't know how to get ahold of the event -- I tried "event = element.onclick", shown below, but that doesn't work. How do I get the event?

<head>
<script>
  function showMenu(element) {
      alert("div clicked");
      event = element.onclick;  // HOW TO GET HOLD OF THE EVENT?
      // Don't propogate the event to the document
      if (event.stopPropagation) {
          event.stopPropagation();   // W3C model
      } else {
          event.cancelBubble = true; // IE model
      }
  }

  document.onclick = function() {
      alert('document clicked');
  };
</script>
</head>

<body>
  <div id="foodmenu" onclick="showMenu(this);">Click inside this div</div>
  or click outside the div.
</body>
share|improve this question

6 Answers 6

up vote 12 down vote accepted

Change your function definition to include the event:

function showMenu(event, element) {
  alert("div clicked");
  // Don't propogate the event to the document
  if (event.stopPropagation) {
      event.stopPropagation();   // W3C model
  } else {
      event.cancelBubble = true; // IE model
  }
}

Then change the call to pass in the event:

div id="fooddmenu" onclick="showMenu(event, this);">Click inside this div</div>
share|improve this answer
    
Terrific! I tried your fix and it works! Thank you so much. A follow-up, if you please. I had spent hours searching and reading quirksmode and chapters of books and couldn't find this answer anywhere. Where does the authoritative reference state that the first argument of an event handler is the event? (Is "event" a reserved keyword here?) –  douglas.kramer Jun 19 '10 at 18:44
3  
It doesn't have to be the first argument. The order is determined by the event setup in the HTML, e.g. if you used onclick="showMenu(this, event);" then the second argument would be the event data. –  Ben Voigt Jun 19 '10 at 18:52
    
What Ben said :) –  Hooray Im Helping Jun 19 '10 at 19:01
    
Great! So it appears 'event' is a reserved argument, like 'this'. I'm still curious what website is the authoritative reference for the event parameter. I've looked at w3c.org and mozilla. –  douglas.kramer Jun 19 '10 at 20:03
    
A good place to start: javascript.crockford.com –  Hooray Im Helping Jun 20 '10 at 0:39

Try EventListeners:

html:

<div id="fooddmenu">Click inside this div</div>or click outside the div.​​​​​​​​​​

js:

function showMenu(e) {
    alert("div clicked");
}

document.onclick = function() {
    alert('document clicked');
};

window.onload = function(){
    document.getElementById("fooddmenu").addEventListener("click", function(e){
        showMenu(this);
        e.stopPropagation();

    });
};
share|improve this answer
    
Thank you. This is a clean alternative. –  douglas.kramer Jun 19 '10 at 20:17

well, that's a jquery code. $("#id") same as document.getElementById("id")

.click function is same as addEvent("click", function() { ... } );

so basically both the functions there are click handlers for Parent and Child DIVs.

Observe the output by commenting / uncommenting the "return false;" statement.

Hope that helps.

By the way, sorry for that "$" confusion.

share|improve this answer

Add the onclick to the body element.

share|improve this answer
$("div").click(function(){
  ...
  ...
  ...

  return false; //this will stop the further propagation of the event
});
share|improve this answer
    
I looked into this, and it seems "return false" does NOT stop further propagation of the event. It simply prevents the default action from taking effect, which is different. For example, if you click on a link, "return false" would prevent the browser from following the link, but would not prevent the event from bubbling up to the document where it could fire document.click=function() {alert("hi");}; –  douglas.kramer Jun 23 '10 at 18:15

Douglas, It does stop the event from getting bubbled up.

Check this out http://jsbin.com/ahoyi/edit

here, if you comment the alert statement, it will show 2 alerts on clicking the smaller box else only one.

Hope this helps.

share|improve this answer
    
Thanks for showing me that. I"m unclear what the dollar sign '$' does. I tried replacing it with document.getElementById("parent") but that give an error: "Object #<an HTMLDivElement> has no method 'click'" –  douglas.kramer Jun 28 '10 at 15:38

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.