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I'm building Pylons web applications that use a lot of jQuery and AJAX/JSON to make these apps more Web 2.0'ie. I've been looking at the server push technologies and have questions about how to do this with Pylons. I've looked at Comet and NodeJS (though I don't know much about NodeJS yet) and am confused about what would be a good method to implement server push techniques in Pylons. I'm currently "emulating" this by having my JavasScript client app perform periodic polling in order to update the app content.

Does anyone have any information/pointers/hints/help about what I'm talking about in the paragraph above? Your help would most definitely be appreciated!

Thanks in advance! Doug

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2 Answers 2

up vote 4 down vote accepted

Pylons is unlikely to help you with "Comet" (aka Server Push) Comet relies on "seeping" data over connections open for long time. Pylons is WSGI in the core - which really precludes long-open connections.

You will likely need a separate ASYNCHRONOUS messaging server that will be your "comet" server.

For starters, take a look at a good example of Comet functionality in action: http://code.stanziq.com/speeqe/ Site is interesting because they note the more popular kits for gluing Comet together on Python: Punjab, BOSH, XMPP.

After that, take a look at Orbited. Then, take a look at Tornado. After about a day of reading up on all that, you will know what to choose as back-end for a "comet" functionality.

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Thanks for the feedback. I was thinking kind of the same thing; Pylons doesn't lend it self to long lived HTTP connections of the kind prescribed by Comet. –  writes_on Jun 22 '10 at 17:02
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It looks like there is a way to do long connections with Pylons: ionelmc.wordpress.com/2008/04/29/… –  Joril Aug 22 '11 at 17:28
    
Nice async example Joril. This example, however, requires you to run your WSGI app on one specific WSGI server - Cogen. –  ddotsenko Aug 22 '11 at 19:01

If you don't know much about NodeJS yet, I highly recommend watching Ryan Dahl's talk from JSConf.

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Video also at JSConfEU's blip.tv channel: jsconfeu.blip.tv/file/2899135 –  yarmiganosca Jun 21 '10 at 15:03

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