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I was thinking along the lines of using typeid() but I don't know how to ask if that type is a subclass of another class (which, by the way, is abstract)

Edit: I should definitely mention the language, C++

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this varies by language, what language are you using? –  Steven A. Lowe Nov 21 '08 at 3:42
    
Oh I'm sorry, C++ –  Chad Nov 21 '08 at 3:50

7 Answers 7

up vote 22 down vote accepted

You really shouldn't. If your program needs to know what class an object is, that usually indicates a design flaw. See if you can get the behavior you want using virtual functions. Also, more information about what you are trying to do would help.

I am assuming you have a situation like this:

class Base;
class A : public Base {...};
class B : public Base {...};

void foo(Base *p)
{
  if(/* p is A */) /* do X */
  else /* do Y */
}

If this is what you have, then try to do something like this:

class Base
{
  virtual void bar() = 0;
};

class A : public Base
{
  void bar() {/* do X */}
};

class B : public Base
{
  void bar() {/* do Y */}
};

void foo(Base *p)
{
  p->bar();
}
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7  
+1. I think the correct name for this is "Tell, don't ask". Basically, always favour polymorphism (TELLing an object what to do, letting the implementation take care of it) over a case/if statement where you ASK to find out what type of object you are dealing with. –  LeopardSkinPillBoxHat Nov 21 '08 at 4:09
10  
yep - this is all good - but the guy wanted to know about how to resolve type –  JohnIdol Nov 21 '08 at 8:50
    
JohnIdol, I get it. And it is still a bad idea. –  Dima Nov 21 '08 at 15:51
1  
@Dima, and what if someone wants to know the syntax just for learning purposes (let's say they are going through a book written in Java, about design flaws, and they need to translate that to C++)? –  patchwork Feb 5 at 9:38
    
I need to find out the type of an object for debugging purposes, because I need to know what strange objects are getting inserted into my dictionary and making it crash. Is there no hope? dynamic_cast seems infeasible, because the object's type could be almost anything. –  ftvs Mar 27 at 8:39

 

class Base
{
  public: virtual ~Base() {}
};

class D1: public Base {};

class D2: public Base {};

int main(int argc,char* argv[]);
{
  D1   d1;
  D2   d2;

  Base*  x = (argc > 2)?&d1:&d2;

  if (dynamic_cast<D2*>(x) == NULL)
  {
    std::cout << "NOT A D2" << std::endl;
  }
  if (dynamic_cast<D1*>(x) == NULL)
  {
    std::cout << "NOT A D1" << std::endl;
  }
}
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You can do it with dynamic_cast (at least for polymorphic types).

Actually, on second thought--you can't tell if it is SPECIFICALLY a particular type with dynamic_cast--but you can tell if it is that type or any subclass thereof.

template <class DstType, class SrcType>
bool IsType(const SrcType* src)
{
  return dynamic_cast<const DstType*>(src) != 0;
}
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dynamic_cast can determine if the type contains the target type anywhere in the inheritance hierarchy (yes, it's a little-known feature that if B inherits from A and C, it can turn an A* directly into a C*). typeid() can determine the exact type of the object. However, these should both be used extremely sparingly. As has been mentioned already, you should always be avoiding dynamic type identification, because it indicates a design flaw. (also, if you know the object is for sure of the target type, you can do a downcast with a static_cast. Boost offers a polymorphic_downcast that will do a downcast with dynamic_cast and assert in debug mode, and in release mode it will just use a static_cast).

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I don't know if I understand your problem correctly, so let me restate it in my own words...

Problem: Given classes B and D, determine if D is a subclass of B (or vice-versa?)

Solution: Use some template magic! Okay, seriously you need to take a look at LOKI, an excellent template meta-programming library produced by the fabled C++ author Andrei Alexandrescu.

More specifically, download LOKI and include TypeManip,h from it in your source code then use the SuperSubclass class template as follows:

if(SuperSubClass<B,D>::value)
{
...
}

According to documentation, SuperSubClass<B,D>::value will be true if B is a public base of D, or if B and D are aliases of the same type.

i.e. either D is a subclass of B or D is the same as B.

I hope this helps.

edit:

Please note the evaluation of SuperSubClass<B,D>::value happens at compile time unlike some methods which use dynamic_cast, hence there is no penalty for using this system at runtime.

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In c# you can simply say:

if (myObj is Car) {

}
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I answered this before the poster edit-ed his question and indicated his language choice. –  Decker Nov 21 '08 at 20:05

You can only do it at compile time using templates, unless you use RTTI.

It lets you use the typeid function which will yield a pointer to a type_info structure which contains information about the type.

Read up on it at Wikipedia

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