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Need your help guys in forming a query.

Example. Company - Car Rental

Table - Cars

ID  NAME       STATUS
1   Mercedes   Showroom
2   Mercedes   On-Road

Now, how do I select only one entry from this table which satisfies the below conditions?

  1. If Mercedes is available in Showroom, then fetch only that row. (i.e. row 1 in above example)

  2. But If none of the Mercedes are available in the showroom, then fetch any one of the rows. (i.e. row 1 or row 2) - (This is just to say that all the mercedes are on-road)

Using distinct ain't helping here as the ID's are also fetched in the select statement

Thanks!

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4 Answers

up vote 0 down vote accepted

MySQL doesn't have ranking/analytic/windowing functions, but you can use a variable to simulate ROW_NUMBER functionality (when you see "--", it's a comment):

SELECT x.id, x.name, x.status
  FROM (SELECT t.id,
               t.name,
               t.status,
               CASE 
                 WHEN @car_name != t.name THEN @rownum := 1 -- reset on diff name
                 ELSE @rownum := @rownum + 1 
               END AS rank,
               @car_name := t.name -- necessary to set @car_name for the comparison
          FROM CARS t 
          JOIN (SELECT @rownum := NULL, @car_name := '') r
      ORDER BY t.name, t.status DESC) x  --ORDER BY is necessary for rank value
 WHERE x.rank = 1

Ordering by status DESC means that "Showroom" will be at the top of the list, so it'll be ranked as 1. If the car name doesn't have a "Showroom" status, the row ranked as 1 will be whatever status comes after "Showroom". The WHERE clause will only return the first row for each car in the table.

The status being a text based data type tells me your data is not normalized - I could add records with "Showroom", "SHOWroom", and "showROOM". They'd be valid, but you're looking at using functions like LOWER & UPPER when you are grouping things for counting, sum, etc. The use of functions would also render an index on the column useless... You'll want to consider making a CAR_STATUS_TYPE_CODE table, and use a foreign key relationship to make sure bad data doesn't get into your table:

DROP TABLE IF EXISTS `example`.`car_status_type_code`;
CREATE TABLE  `example`.`car_status_type_code` (
  `car_status_type_code_id` int(10) unsigned NOT NULL auto_increment,
  `description` varchar(45) NOT NULL default '',
  PRIMARY KEY  (`car_status_type_code_id`)
) ENGINE=InnoDB DEFAULT CHARSET=latin1;
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Thanks a lot mate! That's exactly what I wanted. Actually, the statuses are int columns in my DB. But while providing an example here I gave it as text. Sorry for the confusion. –  user355562 Jun 20 '10 at 17:19
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Here's a common way of solving that problem:

SELECT *,
CASE STATUS
WHEN 'Showroom' THEN 0
ELSE 1
END AS InShowRoom
FROM Cars
WHERE NAME = 'Mercedes'
ORDER BY InShowRoom
LIMIT 1

Here's how to get all the cars, which also shows another way to solve the problem:

SELECT ID, NAME, IFNULL(c2.STATUS, c1.STATUS)
FROM Cars c1
LEFT OUTER JOIN Cars c2
ON c2.NAME = c1.NAME AND c2.STATUS = 'Showroom'
GROUP BY NAME
ORDER BY NAME
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Thanks Marcus. Nice trick indeed! :-) Is it possible to generalize it? i.e. When the Cars table has other cars as well and if there are more than two rows for the same car. –  user355562 Jun 20 '10 at 16:02
    
Okay....Combining your logic, I will try to see if the current row being fetched has not been fetched already. That should solve it I guess. Edit : But the query might take a long time when there are numerous records in the table. –  user355562 Jun 20 '10 at 16:22
    
@rocksolid, I've edited my answer to show how to return rows for all the cars using the same conditions. This could also be performed with a sub query, but I like JOINs better. –  Marcus Adams Jun 20 '10 at 16:23
    
Thanks Marcus. But have decided to go ahead with the solution given by OMG Ponies –  user355562 Jun 20 '10 at 17:22
2  
Not everyone likes simple, I suppose. –  Marcus Adams Jun 20 '10 at 17:27
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SELECT * FROM cars 
  WHERE name = 'Mercedes' 
  AND status = 'Showroom' 
UNION SELECT * FROM cars 
  WHERE name = 'Mercedes' 
LIMIT 1;

EDIT Removed the ALL on the UNION since we only want distinct rows anyway.

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By default UNION returns an unordered set of rows. Therefore, you should use UNION ALL so that MySQL keeps the order. However, I don't know if this can be relied upon. It is probably best to specify an order using ORDER BY. –  Marcus Adams Jun 20 '10 at 16:00
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You would want to use the FIND_IN_SET() function to do that.

SELECT *
FROM Cars
WHERE NAME = 'Mercedes'
ORDER BY FIND_IN_SET(`STATUS`,'Showroom') DESC
LIMIT 1

If you have a preferred order of other statuses, just add them to the second parameter.

ORDER BY FIND_IN_SET(`STATUS`,'On-Road,Showroom' ) DESC

To fetch 'best' status for all cars you can simply do this:

SELECT *
FROM Cars
GROUP BY NAME
ORDER BY FIND_IN_SET(`STATUS`,'Showroom') DESC
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When using FIND_IN_SET() with multiple items in the string list, note that since you're using DESC for the order, you'd want to put your preferred items in descending order in the string list. –  Marcus Adams Jun 20 '10 at 16:06
    
Thanks mate. Will check this out. But how do we write it in a general manner? Cars table with other cars as well? –  user355562 Jun 20 '10 at 16:09
    
Not quite sure if i follow you there. The ORDER BY FIND_IN_SET() is just a way to order elements in a non-numerical and non-alphabetic order, but rather a user defined order. The rest of the query could be handled like any other queries with joins and subselects. –  Ivar Bonsaksen Jun 20 '10 at 16:20
    
Okay...What I meant was that, how do we use this query without the WHERE clause? (If there are other cars in the table). –  user355562 Jun 20 '10 at 16:25
1  
Sorry, missed that though I still loath to rely on MySQL's non-standard behavior of omitting columns from the GROUP BY. There are few if any databases the query would port to. –  OMG Ponies Jun 20 '10 at 17:12
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