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I have a question regarding postgresql sequences.

For instance, for bigserial datatype, is it true that the sequence is advanced, then the number is retrieved and even if the insertion/committing is not successful, the sequence doesn't backtracks. Which means the next time I might be doing insertion to the table, that might be a gap in the sequence number.

Theres a before insert row trigger on my table and Im using psycopg2.

thanks in advance.

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2 Answers 2

up vote 4 down vote accepted

even if the insertion/committing is not successful, the sequence doesn't backtracks. Which means the next time I might be doing insertion to the table, that might be a gap in the sequence number.

Yes, that's true, And that's fine. One usually wants a sequence to get values in a table that are unique (typically for a PK) and gaps don't matter at all.

If you are curious: this is natural behaviour if one thinks about concurrency. Suppose a transaction T1 inserts a row, getting a PK1 from a sequence, uses that value to build another records in other tables... in the meantime (before T1 commits) another transaction T2 inserts a row in the same table. Then T1 rollbacks and T2 commits...

BTW: If you want a "gap-less" sequence ... first ask yourself if you really want that (usually you really don't - and requiring that frequently points to a conceptual problem in your design)... but if you really need it, you can read this.

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Continuation on above: You really ought not to worry about "gaps" in a surrogate key. Doing so (in my experience) indicates a surrogate that isn't opaque enough. And as far as a sequence, it's guaranteed monotonically increasing (unless reset) so... –  user166390 Jun 21 '10 at 3:26
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even that it is increasing should be superfluous –  Evan Carroll Jun 21 '10 at 3:32
    
right, i got it guys. thanks for the explanation. –  goh Jun 21 '10 at 3:50
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For the same reason as there can be gaps, it can also be seen not to be increasing- if transaction T2 got a later sequence number but committed first in the case above, and then T1 committed, a later sequence number would become visible first. –  araqnid Jun 21 '10 at 8:20

Backtracking would require locking until completion. This would be bad, especially when 10 tables can all utilize the same sequence. If you want an order don't use a sequence use a window function like row_number().

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thanks for the help. –  goh Jun 21 '10 at 3:51

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