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Hello friends it may sound awkward but i am novice to asp dotnet web development realm, so my question is genuine. Please explain me about what is postback in asp.net. I want it's practical meaning and how does it work in the page life cycle while i dp understand ispostBack and i use it as well.

But i am not getting good meaning of post back please explain it to me with good example.

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There are lots and lots of information about this on Google, e.g. this YouTube video. –  Deniz Dogan Jun 21 '10 at 7:13

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The wikipedia page on Postback has the answers:

In the context of ASP web development, a postback is another name for HTTP POST. In an interactive webpage, the contents of a form are sent to the server for processing some information. Afterwards, the server sends a new page back to the browser.

This is done to verify passwords for logging in, process an on-line order form, or other such tasks that a client computer cannot do on its own. This is not to be confused with refresh or back actions taken by the buttons on the browser.

For more detail on the page life cycle, see MSDN, there is quite a lot of detail here.

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But what is the relationship between post back and page load.. using break point i have seen that when a button is submitted and it's property of post back is true i see page load takes place first then it post back so when the changes are committed ... –  NoviceToDotNet Jun 22 '10 at 18:00
    
@rupeshmalviya - postback is where the page lifecycle begins. You post back a form and then the page life cycle starts - one of the points in that life cycle is the page load event. –  Oded Jun 22 '10 at 18:18
    
Thanks bro for your explanation.. i learnt it now... –  NoviceToDotNet Jun 23 '10 at 8:50

Check out the introductory videos on http://www.asp.net/web-forms especially the one titled Page Lifecycle Events

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But what is the relationship between post back and page load.. using break point i have seen that when a button is submitted and it's property of post back is true i see page load takes place first then it post back so when the changes are committed ... –  NoviceToDotNet Jun 22 '10 at 17:59

A postback is when a web page post a form back to the same URL.

Historically, a web form would post to the next page, so a search form for example would post to the results page, not back to the search form.

The ASP.NET web forms rely heavily on postbacks to create an environment that is close to how a windows form application works. By posting back to the same page, it can have server events that seem to react to actions in the browser. Clicking a button will cause a postback, and the browser will load the same page again, with only the changes that the button click event caused.

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But what is the relationship between post back and page load.. using break point i have seen that when a button is submitted and it's property of post back is true i see page load takes place first then it post back so when the changes are committed ... –  NoviceToDotNet Jun 22 '10 at 17:58
    
@rupeshmalviya: You are mixing up concepts. A postback is not an event in the .NET cycle, the postback is the entire request that causes the page to reload. Thus, the postback starts before the Load event, and completes after the Unload event when the new page is sent back as response. –  Guffa Jun 23 '10 at 5:21
    
Oh!! thanks Guffa For your explanation, u r true i was considering post back as an event ......postback takes place at the beginning of Life cycle of page so it is nothing to do with page load –  NoviceToDotNet Jun 23 '10 at 8:48

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