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I'm not sure if the question title is accurate... Let me start by explaining my original simple scenario, and then move on to explain what would I like to do, but can't.

Originally, I had something like:

class Operand;

Operand genOperandA() { ...; return Operand(); }
Operand genOperandB() { ...; return Operand(); }
... // more operand-generation functions

typedef Operand (*OpGen)();

// Table of function pointers
static const OpGen generators[] =
{
    genOperandA,
    genOperandB,
    ...
};

// Function to do some operation on the operand
void operate(Operand& op);

...

// Example call
operate(generators[1]());

So far so good (I think). However, there are now several derived operand types, e.g. class RegisterOperand : public Operand. I have new, dedicated genOperand functions that ideally would return instances of the derived types. But I can't do this:

Operand genOperandC() { ...; return RegisterOperand(); }

and I can't do this:

RegisterOperand genOperandC() { ...; return RegisterOperand(); }

static const OpGen generators[] = 
{
    ...
    genOperandC,
};

However, I know this would work if I were to return reference or pointer types, so the only option I currently have is something like:

Operand *genOperandC() { ...; return new RegisterOperand(); }

which now requires explicit cleanup which wasn't necessary originally.

Any alternatives I haven't considered?

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3 Answers 3

up vote 3 down vote accepted

There might be other designs that doesn't require you to use pointers, but if you need or want to go this way, this might interest you.


If returning a pointer is a problem (because of the need to "clean-up" things), you definitely should consider using smart pointers as return type.

Here is an example of your factory method with smart pointers:

boost::shared_ptr<Operand> genOperandC()
{
  return boost::shared_ptr<Operand>(new RegisterOperand());
}

This way, you won't have to call delete manually: it will be done by the destructor of boost::shared_ptr<Operand> for you when required.

If afterwards you need to cast the resulting pointer, boost provides casting functions as well:

boost::shared_ptr<Operand> op = genOperandC();

boost::shared_ptr<RegisterOperand> rop =
  boost::dynamic_pointer_cast<RegisterOperand>(op);
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1  
Use boost::make_shared instead of creating the shared pointer yourself, it's a simple wrapper method but reduce the number of memory allocations necessary (and thus is faster) –  Matthieu M. Jun 21 '10 at 9:09

You can wrap:

class Operand
{
public:

private:
  std::unique_ptr<OperandImpl> mImpl;
};

This is similar to a Strategy Pattern: the actual operand behavior is hidden, and accessible through a Non-Virtual Interface. The user get a copy of Operand, she does not need to know anything about its internal and can use it, and you are free to implement various derived behaviors.

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Is the idea here that my different subtypes would actually inherit from OperandImpl, and that member calls to Operand should simply be delegated to *mImpl? –  Oli Charlesworth Jun 21 '10 at 8:37
    
Yes, this is a classic Strategy Pattern where the actual memory handling is hidden from the client (instead of returning a pointer, smart or not, to OperandImpl). You can however do some work before delegating (checking arguments, logging etc...) –  Matthieu M. Jun 21 '10 at 9:07

How about something like this?

Note that you can't simply do operate(generators[i]()) as the original operate() take a non-const reference.

#include <iostream>
#include <string>
#include <memory>

class Operand {
public:
        Operand(std::string x = "Operand"): x(x) {}
        const std::string x;
};

class RegisterOperand: public Operand {
public:
        RegisterOperand(std::string x = "RegisterOperand")
                : Operand(x) {}
};

typedef std::auto_ptr<Operand> POperand;

POperand genOperandA() { return POperand(new Operand("genOperandA")); }
POperand genOperandB() { return POperand(new Operand("genOperandB")); }
POperand genOperandC() { return POperand(new RegisterOperand()); }
// more operand-generation functions

typedef POperand (*OpGen)();

// Table of function pointers
static const OpGen generators[] =
{
        genOperandA,
        genOperandB,
        genOperandC,
};

void operate(const POperand& op)
{
        std::cout << op->x << std::endl;
}

int main()
{
        operate(generators[0]());
        operate(generators[1]());
        operate(generators[2]());
        return 0;
}
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The use of auto_ptr is deprecated in C++0x. Prefer using unique_ptr instead. If you don't have access to C++0x yet, then prefer shared_ptr. –  Matthieu M. Jun 21 '10 at 9:11
1  
@Matthieu: While I like unique_ptr very much, I'd be hesitant to use it because it relies on a C++0x language feature. I think it's okay to use std::auto_ptr if you know what you're doing and don't want the reference-counting overhead of shared_ptr. Just my 2 cents. –  sellibitze Jun 21 '10 at 9:56

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