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Edit: Not JUnit 4 available at this time.

Hi there,

I have a question about "smart" exception testing with JUnit. At this time, I do it like this:

public void testGet() {

    SoundFileManager sfm = new SoundFileManager();

        // Test adding a sound file and then getting it by id and name.
        try {
            SoundFile addedFile = sfm.addSoundfile("E:\\Eclipse_Prj\\pSound\\data\\Adrenaline01.wav");
            SoundFile sf = sfm.getSoundfile(addedFile.getID());
            assertTrue(sf!=null);
            System.out.println(sf.toString());

            sf = sfm.getSoundfileByName("E:\\Eclipse_Prj\\pSound\\data\\Adrenaline01.wav");
            assertTrue(sf!=null);
            System.out.println(sf.toString());
        } catch (RapsManagerException e) {
            System.out.println(e.getMessage());
        }

        // Test get with invalid id. 
        try {
            sfm.getSoundfile(-100);
            fail("Should have raised a RapsManagerException");
        } catch (RapsManagerException e) {
            System.out.println(e.getMessage());
        }

        // Test get by name with invalid name
        try {
            sfm.getSoundfileByName(new String());
            fail("Should have raised a RapsManagerException");
        } catch (RapsManagerException e) {
            System.out.println(e.getMessage());
        }

    }

As you can see, I need one try/catch block for each function that is supposed to throw an exception. It seems not to be a good way to do this - or is there no possibility to reduce the use of try/catch?

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I would suggest against doing System.out.println inside test. System.out and System.err tend to mixup and produce garbled test output. –  RockyMM Nov 20 '12 at 12:31

4 Answers 4

up vote 24 down vote accepted

I suggest that you need to break up testGet into multiple separate tests. The individual try/catch blocks seem to be pretty independent of each other. You may also want to extract the common initialization logic into its own setup method.

Once you have that, you can use JUnit4's exception annotation support, something like this:

public class MyTest {

private SoundManager sfm;

@Before
public void setup() {
      sfm = new SoundFileManager();
}

@Test
public void getByIdAndName() {
  // Test adding a sound file and then getting it by id and name.
      SoundFile addedFile =              
      sfm.addSoundfile("E:\\Eclipse_Prj\\pSound\\data\\Adrenaline01.wav");
      SoundFile sf = sfm.getSoundfile(addedFile.getID());
      assertTrue(sf!=null);
      System.out.println(sf.toString());

      sf = sfm.getSoundfileByName("E:\\Eclipse_Prj\\pSound\\data\\Adrenaline01.wav");
      assertTrue(sf!=null);
      System.out.println(sf.toString());
}

@Test(expected=RapsManagerException.class)
public void getByInvalidId() {
      // Test get with invalid id. 
      sfm.getSoundfile(-100);
}

@Test(expected=RapsManagerException.class)
public void getByInvalidName() {
      // Test get with invalid id. 
      sfm.getSoundfileByName(new String());
}
}
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I like this one, but i'm afraid of switching to JUnit4 in a running project. –  InsertNickHere Jun 21 '10 at 9:01
4  
@InsertNickHere: Your caution is commendable, but I suggest misplaced in this case. JUnit4 can run JUnit3-style tests without change, allowing you to gradually migrate one test at a time. Also, JUnit4 is now 4 years old, it's really time you moved. –  skaffman Jun 21 '10 at 9:29
1  
I have to totally agree with you-in this case I have to get moved to JUnit 4. –  InsertNickHere Jun 21 '10 at 9:35
    
how to use this annotation to mention multiple expected exceptions? For e.g. a method might throw IO exception and Number format exception in the same execution. shall i write two different test methods? –  Vijay Bhore Mar 19 '13 at 18:20
    
Got the answer for my doubt stackoverflow.com/questions/1410172/… –  Vijay Bhore Mar 19 '13 at 18:32

If you have an expected exception and you can't use an annotation to trap it, you need to catch it and assert that you've got what you expected. For example:

Throwable caught = null;
try {
   somethingThatThrows();
} catch (Throwable t) {
   caught = t;
}
assertNotNull(caught);
assertSame(FooException.class, caught.getClass());

If you can use an annotation instead, do that as it's much clearer. But that's not always possible (e.g., because you're testing a sequence of methods or because you're using JUnit 3).

share|improve this answer
    
Sorry but I don't see any advantage of your version compared to mine. Maybe there is none with JUnit3 :( –  InsertNickHere Jun 21 '10 at 9:03
1  
You're putting too much in a test case. You're putting too much in a try. You're printing messages out for manual reading rather than making test assertions fail! (You're embedding non-portable paths in your code, but that's your business…) –  Donal Fellows Jun 21 '10 at 9:15
    
The paths are just for this example, I will not post 100% original code here. But thanks for that advice anyway. :) –  InsertNickHere Jun 21 '10 at 9:35

With JUnit 4, you can use annotations instead. However, you should separate your test into 3 distinct methods for this to work cleanly. Note that IMHO catching an exception in the first scenario should be a failure, so I modified the catch block accordingly.

public void testGet() {
    SoundFileManager sfm = new SoundFileManager();

    // Test adding a sound file and then getting it by id and name.
    try {
        SoundFile addedFile = sfm.addSoundfile("E:\\Eclipse_Prj\\pSound\\data\\Adrenaline01.wav");
        SoundFile sf = sfm.getSoundfile(addedFile.getID());
        assertTrue(sf!=null);
        System.out.println(sf.toString());

        sf = sfm.getSoundfileByName("E:\\Eclipse_Prj\\pSound\\data\\Adrenaline01.wav");
        assertTrue(sf!=null);
        System.out.println(sf.toString());
    } catch (RapsManagerException e) {
        fail(e.getMessage());
    }
}

@Test(expected=RapsManagerException.class)
public void testGetWithInvalidId() {
    SoundFileManager sfm = new SoundFileManager();

    sfm.getSoundfile(-100);
}

@Test(expected=RapsManagerException.class)
public void testGetWithInvalidName() {
    SoundFileManager sfm = new SoundFileManager();

    sfm.getSoundfileByName(new String());
}
share|improve this answer
    
As I said above, I like the idea but I'm afaid of switching to JUnit4 in a running project. –  InsertNickHere Jun 21 '10 at 9:02
    
@InsertNickHere, you should break up your test into 3 individual methods anyway, with common setup. Then if you really want to minimize the exception handling code (and you have lots of duplicate code like the ones you show) you could extract the try/catch into a separate method, and pass the actual method to be tested via an interface (but this is really overkill IMHO, and it makes your test code more difficult to understand). –  Péter Török Jun 21 '10 at 9:08

The most concise syntax is provided by catch-exception:

public void testGet() {
    SoundFileManager sfm = new SoundFileManager();
    ... // setup sound file manager

    verifyException(sfm, RapsManagerException.class)
       .getSoundfile(-100);

    verifyException(sfm, RapsManagerException.class)
       .getSoundfileByName(new String());
}
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