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I want to sort objects based on Boolean values and I want to sort true values before false values.

Which of these implementations of compareTo is more readable?

Using -1 to change default behavior

public class Example implements Comparable<Example>{

  Boolean isOk;

  public int compareTo(Example o) {
      return -1 * this.isOk.compareTo(o.isOk);
  }

}

or swap sides of Boolean#compareTo method?

public class ExampleTwo implements Comparable<ExampleTwo>{

  Boolean isOk;

  public int compareTo(ExampleTwo o) {
      return o.isOk.compareTo(this.isOk);
  }

}
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3  
Using -1 * introduces a subtle bug if the the compareTo() method ever returns Integer.MIN_VALUE, because Integer.MIN_VALUE * -1 == Integer.MIN_VALUE. For that reason I wouldn't ever write a compareTo() method that could return such extreme values, but it would be absolutely conforming to the specification, so you must be able to handle it. –  Joachim Sauer Jun 21 '10 at 11:18
    
@Joachim: I was just writing the same thing in my answer :) –  Jon Skeet Jun 21 '10 at 11:20
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2 Answers

up vote 2 down vote accepted

The first form is simply wrong - because if compareTo returns Integer.MIN_VALUE, it will try to negate that - and result in Integer.MIN_VALUE again.

The easiest way to fix that is just to use the code from the second snippet.

On the other hand:

  • Both could fail if isOk is null
  • If you're really only using Booleans, a simple truth table may be simpler
  • It's possible that Boolean.compareTo will never return Integer.MIN_VALUE. I wouldn't rely on that though.
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I agree with the answer but would like to point out #2 could also fail if o is null, and (though I agree #1 is not ideal) the Integer.MIN_VALUE issue could be fixed with a call to Math.signum. –  M. Jessup Jun 21 '10 at 12:12
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I'd use the Ordering class from Guava (formerly Google Collections), it implements Comparator, so it can be used as a drop-in replacement:

Ordering<Object> reverseOrdering = Ordering.natural().reverse();
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+1 - when in doubt, consult Guava :) –  Jon Skeet Jun 21 '10 at 11:43
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