Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

Does STL and Vector provide the default sorting option?.

share|improve this question
3  
what is "the default sorting option"? –  jalf Jun 21 '10 at 12:24
add comment

4 Answers

The vector class doesn't have a sort function.

But there is a sort which works on all iterator ranges. And vector does expose iterators.

To sort a vector vec:

#include <algorithm>

std::sort(vec.begin(), vec.end());
share|improve this answer
1  
This is what you'll want to do, Boost is absolutely NOT necessary for this whatsoever. –  rubenvb Jun 21 '10 at 12:35
3  
Not all containers - only those with random access. list has a member function sort, ordered associative containers are already sorted, and unordered associative containers can't be sorted. –  Mike Seymour Jun 21 '10 at 12:37
    
For completeness, you could mention that it is possible to specify how it should be sorted as well. –  Mattias Nilsson Jun 21 '10 at 12:38
1  
@Mike: true, of course. I edited my answer. I just didn't want to go into too much detail about iterators since the OP might not be familiar with them. –  jalf Jun 21 '10 at 12:41
1  
@Mattias: true, but the OP has said nothing to indicate that he needs this. If he does, I'll edit it in. –  jalf Jun 21 '10 at 12:42
show 1 more comment

Yes, there is sort() in stl algorithms. You should look at http://www.cplusplus.com/reference/algorithm/sort/

share|improve this answer
    
i can sort ascending as well as descending right? –  Naruto Jun 21 '10 at 13:21
6  
@Shadow: Sure. For example: std::sort(vec.begin(),vec.end(),std::greater<int>());, see <algorithm> and <functional> –  sellibitze Jun 21 '10 at 13:34
    
oh, thanks lot.. –  Naruto Jun 21 '10 at 14:25
add comment

You probably want std::sort.

#include <algorithm>
#include <vector>

int
main()
{
    std::vector<int> foo;

    std::sort( foo.begin(), foo.end() );

    return 0;
}

a similar example using two boost libraries is below.

#include <boost/assign/list_of.hpp>

#include <boost/foreach.hpp>

#include <algorithm>
#include <iostream>
#include <vector>

int
main()
{
    std::vector<int> foo = boost::assign::list_of(1)(4)(5)(10)(3)(2);

    std::cout << "unsorted" << std::endl;
    BOOST_FOREACH( const int i, foo ) {
        std::cout << i << std::endl;
    }

    std::sort( foo.begin(), foo.end() );

    std::cout << "sorted" << std::endl;
    BOOST_FOREACH( const int i, foo ) {
        std::cout << i << std::endl;
    }

    return 0;
}
share|improve this answer
15  
I think your code example would be better if you stuck to the basics. Requiring the reader to be familiar with two different Boost libraries just to understand a std::sort example might be a bit much to ask. –  jalf Jun 21 '10 at 12:27
    
For simple case, like sorting using boost is most likely not justified. –  Wojtek Jun 21 '10 at 12:42
1  
I think you are over reacting - the two Boost constructs used here are extremely easy to understand, even for a complete beginner to Boost (which I am). Their use was not necessary - in fact simply having the std::sort( beginIndex, endIndex ) line would have been enough - but they hardly "require the reader to be familiar with two Boost libraries". –  Jean Hominal Jun 21 '10 at 14:14
    
@jhominal: I'm not overreacting, I'm just saying the example is less clear than it could have been. I didn't say it is unreadable as it is now, just suggesting an improvement. :) –  jalf Jun 21 '10 at 14:49
    
list_of and foreach are just scratching the surface of boost, you need not be familiar with the entire library to understand what they accomplish. A C++ programmer completely unfamiliar with boost should be able to easily grasp the concepts presented in my example. Unilaterally declaring any use of boost as unnecessary in such a trivial example is why some beginners shy away from using it. Yes it can be intimidating, but the example here shows otherwise. –  Sam Miller Jun 21 '10 at 15:24
show 2 more comments

As other's have mentioned in their answers, there is std::sort function.

However, by "the default sorting option?." do you mean you want to sort a vector where T is a class you have defined. In that case, you have to implement "operator<" in your class.

For example,

class Foo 
{
    public : 
      Foo();
      ~Foo();
    private :
        int c;
};

std::vector<Foo> foovec;
std::sort(foovec.begin(), foovec.end());

To make sure that above "std::sort" line works, you need to define "operator<" in Foo.

 class Foo 
 {
     public : 
       Foo();
       ~Foo();
       bool operator<(const Foo& rFoo) const;
     private :
       int c;
 };

bool Foo::operator<(const Foo& rFoo) const
{
    return(c < rFoo.c);
}
share|improve this answer
add comment

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.