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I have a table containing the runtimes for generators on different sites, and I want to select the most recent entry for each site. Each generator is run once or twice a week.

I have a query that will do this, but I wonder if it's the best option. I can't help thinking that using WHERE x IN (SELECT ...) is lazy and not the best way to formulate the query - any query.

The table is as follows:

CREATE TABLE generator_logs (
    id integer NOT NULL,
    site_id character varying(4) NOT NULL,
    start timestamp without time zone NOT NULL,
    "end" timestamp without time zone NOT NULL,
    duration integer NOT NULL
);

And the query:

SELECT id, site_id, start, "end", duration 
FROM generator_logs
WHERE start IN (SELECT MAX(start) AS start 
                FROM generator_logs 
                GROUP BY site_id) 
ORDER BY start DESC

There isn't a huge amount of data, so I'm not worried about optimizing the query. However, I do have to do similar things on tables with 10s of millions of rows, (big tables as far as I'm concerned!) and there optimisation is more important.

So is there a better query for this, and are inline queries generally a bad idea?

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you probably mean subquery, not "inline" query? –  TMS Jun 14 at 11:35
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5 Answers

up vote 1 down vote accepted

I would use joins as they perform much better then "IN" clause:

select gl.id, gl.site_id, gl.start, gl."end", gl.duration 
from 
    generator_logs gl
    inner join (
    	select max(start) as start, site_id
        from generator_logs 
        group by site_id
    ) gl2
    	on gl.site_id = gl2.site_id
    	and gl.start = gl2.start

Also as Tony pointed out you were missing correlation in your original query

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A way to find records having the MAX value per group is to select those records for which there is no record within the same group having a higher value:

SELECT id, site_id, "start", "end", duration 
FROM generator_logs g1
WHERE NOT EXISTS (
    SELECT 1
    FROM generator_logs g2
    WHERE g2.site_id = g1.site_id
    AND g2."start" > g1."start"
    );
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This problem - finding not just the the MAX, but the rest of the corresponding row - is a common one. Luckily, Postgres provides a nice way to do this with one query, using DISTINCT ON:

SELECT DISTINCT ON (site_id)
  id, site_id, start, "end", duration
FROM generator_logs
ORDER BY site_id, start DESC;

DISTINCT ON (site_id) means "return one record per site_id". The order by clause determines which record that is. Note, however, that this is subtly different from your original query - if you have two records for the same site with the same start, your query would return two records, while this returns only one.

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This will report only one row per site_id, even if two site_id's share the same (max) value for "start". –  wildplasser Jun 14 at 11:26
    
@wildplasser Well spotted. I had that in a previous edit, until I realised that the original query doesn't actually work (it has a GROUP BY instead of a WHERE in the subquery). I think this was the asker's intention ("I want to select the most recent entry for each site"). Anyway, I've put it back. Cheers! –  Nick Barnes Jun 14 at 11:34
    
The OP is not very clear about his intentions. The GROUP BY in the subquery is completely useless, it even works strange: records that happen to match the MAX() of another group will also be selected. –  wildplasser Jun 14 at 11:38
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Should your query not be correlated? i.e.:

SELECT id, site_id, start, "end", duration 
FROM generator_logs g1
WHERE start = (SELECT MAX(g2.start) AS start 
               FROM generator_logs  g2
               WHERE g2.site_id = g1.site_id) 
ORDER BY start DESC

Otherwise you will potentially pick up non-latest logs whose start value happens to match the latest start for a different site.

Or alternatively:

SELECT id, site_id, start, "end", duration 
FROM generator_logs g1
WHERE (site_id, start) IN (SELECT site_id, MAX(g2.start) AS start 
                           FROM generator_logs  g2
                           GROUP BY site_id)
ORDER BY start DESC
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In MYSQL it could be problematic because Last i Checked it was unable to optimise subqueries effectively ( Ie: by query-rewriting )

Many DBMS's have Genetic Query planners which will do the same thing regardless of your input queries structure.

MYSQL will in some cases for that situation create a temp table, other times not, and depending on the circumstances, indexing, condtions, subqueries can still be rather quick.

Some complain that subqueries are hard to read, but they're perfectly fine if you fork them into local variables.

$maxids = 'SELECT MAX(start) AS start FROM generator_logs GROUP BY site_id';
$q ="     
    SELECT id, site_id, start, \"end\", duration 
       FROM generator_logs
       WHERE start IN ($maxids) 
       ORDER BY start DESC
";
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Who said anything about MySQL? –  Nick Barnes Jun 14 at 11:27
    
It was more a comment that much of the opposition you see in TRW is based on mysql being bad at it. And once you learn to think in inline queries, its hard to un-think that, and you'll end up being forced to use mysql one day and you'll still be thinking inline queries are fine and then wonder why performance is so abysmal. –  Kent Fredric Jun 21 at 9:12
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