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I have created a function that has the follwing parameter:

List<Expression<Func<CatalogProduct, bool>>> orderBy = null

This parameter is optional, If it is filled it should create a order by and than by constuction for me, so that I can order the result on the SQL server.

I tried:

            IOrderedQueryable temp = null;
            foreach (Expression<Func<CatalogProduct, bool>> func in orderBy)
            {
                if (temp == null)
                {
                    temp = catalogProducts.OrderBy(func);
                }
                else
                {
                    temp = temp.ThanBy(func);
                }
            }

But the than By is not reconized. Does someone know how I can solve this problem?


I changed it to .ThenBy() but this is only allowed directly after the .OrderBy() and not on a IOrderedQueryable

so temp = catalogProducts.OrderBy(func).ThenBy(func); is allowed but temp = catalogProducts.OrderBy(func); temp = temp.ThenBy(func); issn't

Any other suggestions?

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1  
try ThenBy, not ThanBy? –  RichK Jun 21 '10 at 12:41
    
This is a English usage error, not a programming error! –  Carlos Jun 21 '10 at 12:49
    
See updated answer re your update. –  Marc Gravell Jun 21 '10 at 13:13
    
Comment from Jon, re-posted from your now-deleted answer: "ThenBy is allowed on an IOrderedQueryable; it's not allowed on a plain IQueryable. Are you sure you've declared temp correctly" –  Marc Gravell Jun 21 '10 at 13:14

3 Answers 3

up vote 8 down vote accepted

Two problems; firstly, ThanBy should be ThenBy; secondly, ThenBy is only available on the generic type, IOrderedQueryable<T>.

So change to:

        IOrderedQueryable<CatalogProduct> temp = null;
        foreach (Expression<Func<CatalogProduct, bool>> func in orderBy) {
            if (temp == null) {
                temp = catalogProducts.OrderBy(func);
            } else {
                temp = temp.ThenBy(func);
            }
        }

and you should be sorted.

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3  
+1 for the pun... –  cjk Jun 21 '10 at 13:14

try this

   IOrderedQueryable temp = null; 
   foreach (Expression<Func<CatalogProduct, bool>> func in orderBy) 
    { 
      if (temp == null) 
        { 
          temp = catalogProducts.OrderBy(func);
        } 
        else
        { 
          temp = temp.OrderBy(func); 
        } 
     }
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1  
That will reorder from scratch each time. For multiple orderings, you really ought to use ThenBy. –  Jon Skeet Jun 21 '10 at 12:48
    
Calling a second OrderBy will, depending on the implementation, either do the sorts in the reverse order, or only sort by the last one. –  Marc Gravell Jun 21 '10 at 12:48
    
@Jon - not quite necessarily; remember that LINQ sort is meant to be stable, so this just reverses the sort sequence. –  Marc Gravell Jun 21 '10 at 12:48
    
@Marc: True. It's basically not the right way to go though :) –  Jon Skeet Jun 21 '10 at 12:49
        foreach (Expression<Func<CatalogProduct, bool>> func in orderBy)
        {
            catalogProducts = catalogProducts.OrderBy(func);
        }

This will be OK.

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