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class X
{
  int i;  
  public:
  X(int m) : i(m) {};

  X(const X& x)
  {
    //cout "copy constructor is called\n";
  }

  const X opearator++(X& a,int)
  {
     //cout "X++ is called\n";
     X b(a.i);
     a.i++;
     return b;
  }
  void f(X a)
  {   }
};

 int main()
{ 
  X a(1);
  f(a);
  a++; 
  return 0;
}

Here when function 'f' is called copy constructor is getting called as expected. In case of a++, operator++ function is called but when it returns "copy constructor is not called". why "copy contructor is not called while returning from function 'operator++'?

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You ask why copy contructor is not called while returning from function 'f'. I don't understand, f() is void, it doesn't return anything. –  Binary Worrier Jun 21 '10 at 12:53
2  
Please always provide the real code when asking a question. Since your code contains errors that prevent it from compiling, this is obviously not the code you’re really using. –  Konrad Rudolph Jun 21 '10 at 13:09
    
@BinaryWorrier: f() does not return anything but a++ does ;) –  D.Shawley Jun 21 '10 at 13:11
    
I'm sorry. Next time I'll put the code which will compile without error. I corrected my question also. –  esh Jun 22 '10 at 5:46

6 Answers 6

I believe you've encountered return value optimization (RVO) http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Return_value_optimization

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The web-wide famous C++ FAQ Lite (which you can find here for instance) is a must-read for every C++ programmer.

Your question probably corresponds to that one :
[10.9] Does return-by-value mean extra copies and extra overhead?

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The compiler is permitted to elide the call to a copy constructor when an object is returned from a function.

That is, it is not required to actually call the copy constructor: it can just construct the object to be returned in whatever place the object needs to be to be returned from the function.

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It looks like RVO (Return Value Optimization). Your compiler sees that you are not doing anything with the 'b' instance nor with its returned copy so it removes it (object copy operation) from the compiled output.

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b is not removed. There's just no reason to copy it. Copy elision works by merging source and target object into a single object. When NRVO is applied, b refers to the same object the function returns. –  sellibitze Jun 21 '10 at 13:41
    
@sellibitze: Sorry for the imprecise use of pronouns. The 'it' that gets removed is the call to the copy constructor. The compiler won't optimize out 'b' object altogether because of possible constructor side effects. Those side effects are not given a slide as they are with RVO. Thanks for the comment. –  Amardeep Jun 21 '10 at 14:27

It's legal to ellide copies, even when the copy constructor has side effects. It's called RVO (there's also one for named (comment: thanks) values, NRVO) and is explicitly allowed by the Standard.

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2  
The N in NRVO stands for "named," not "new." –  James McNellis Jun 21 '10 at 12:57
    
Close enough :P –  Puppy Jun 21 '10 at 13:23

Well, you had several errors in your code. If you compile and run the code i've attached you'll see the copy contructor is successfully called when operator++ returns.

#include <iostream>

class X {
public:
    X(int m) : i(m) {};

    X(const X& x)
    {
        std::cout << "Copy constructor is called\n";
    }

    X
    operator++(int)
    {
        std::cout << "X++ is called\n";

        this->i++;
        return *this;
    }


private:
    int i;

};


void
f(X a)
{
}


int
main(void)
{
    X a(1);
    f(a);
    a++;
    return 0;
}
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