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Given a function like so

bool RequestStatus()
{
    ...
    if (code == myCode) {
         return true;
    } else {
         return false;
    }
}

Why would the compiler complain that "Function should return value". Unless I am missing something, how else could it not return true or false? Is it because the value of myCode is runtime dependent so the compiler is not sure on the logical paths?

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What compiler and platform are you using? –  uncle brad Jun 21 '10 at 14:14
    
C++-builder-5 windows xp –  user195488 Jun 21 '10 at 14:15
    
out of curiosity, what compiler are you using? I think your issue is with quantum probability though.. something could clearly be X or not X, but you don't handle the possibility that X isn't even a subset of all things that exist! –  Stefan Valianu Jun 21 '10 at 14:16
1  
Wow, that's a blast from the past. Isn't C++ Builder going on 10 years old now? If memory serves, it's pretty buggy, and you'd be better served by a more recent compiler. –  greyfade Jun 21 '10 at 16:13
3  
@Changeling: Except that this question indicates that it is broke... or at least buggy. –  Bill Jun 21 '10 at 17:01

7 Answers 7

up vote 21 down vote accepted

if you write return (code == myCode); you will save lines, make the compiler happy, and generally be writing in a more C++-ish style.

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True, but that doesn't answer the question. –  uncle brad Jun 21 '10 at 14:14
    
I don't know that exact compiler but to avoid the error the compiler would have to sort of count on its fingers whether every possible path (the if and the else of that if) returns something. It seems like it's happier finding a line outside any conditions that returns. Rewriting into a single line with no if will, as I said, make the compiler happier. –  Kate Gregory Jun 21 '10 at 14:18
    
After two additional years of SWE maturity, I have come to accept this as doctrine. –  user195488 Apr 26 '12 at 16:59

VC++ and g++ will not give a warning message if all branches have a return statement. I guess your compiler (c++-builder-5) can't check properly to determine if there is a return point on all branches. Or there is another condition somewhere that you aren't showing us that doesn't have a return statement.

You can probably trivially refactor your code (which is probably similar to the posted code) to have one return point which will avoid the warning for your compiler.

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Indeed. C++ Builder 5 does not exhaustively check such conditions. (Not like C# where the specification itself mandates they be caught !). And avoiding such warnings with C++ Builder is not always easy, because what the compiler checks depends on the compilation options. Fix the warning in debug build and it sometimes comes back in release build, and conversely :-( –  user192472 Jun 21 '10 at 16:17
    
Thanks Brian - I ended up refactoring the whole thing and it is much better now –  user195488 Jun 21 '10 at 16:42

It would be more elegant to do

bool RequestStatus()
{
    return code == myCode;
}

That may eliminate your compiler message/warning.

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Subjectively I agree with the posters saying you should refactor this into a neat x == y return statement, however there is nothing wrong with the code. It's your compiler.

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I'd imagine it is a compiler misgiving. You are in nested scope and the compiler is probably checking for a return statement in function scope.

In your example:

bool RequestStatus()
{
    ...
    if (code == myCode) {
         return true;
    } else {
         return false;
    }
}

What happens after the if statement? You need a return statement at the end of the function so that all paths of execution are covered. You can refactor the code like this:

bool RequestStatus()
{
    ...
    if (code == myCode) {
         return true;
    } 

    // else 
    return false;
}

or even

return (code == myCode) ? true : false;

But the other suggestion of

return ( code == myCode );

is cleaner.

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Ah, but if logic 1 doesn't pass, then logic 2 will pass so why put a return statement at the end? –  user195488 Jun 21 '10 at 14:17
    
Well, in this case, I think most of us will agree that nothing happens after the 'if' statement (hence the OP's question..) –  phtrivier Jun 21 '10 at 14:18

The following will also likely clear the compiler message/warning.

bool RequestStatus()
{ 
   ...

   if (code == myCode) 
      return true;

   return false;
}
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Is your code really as simple as the snippet you just posted ?

In Delphi (also a Borland/CodeGear/Embarcadero product), I encountered the same "problem" on a piece of wtf code, which was actually a nested-ifs-hell :

if test1 then
  if test2 then
    if test3 then
      if test4 then
        if test5 
          then ...
          else ...
      else
        if test5 
          then ...
          else ...
    else
      if test4 then
        if test5 
          then ...
          else ...
      else
        if test5 
          then ...
          else ...
//etc...

(There were really 5 levels of nested ifs...) The compiler simply sent the warning if there were too many possible branches.

You can also have the warning if your code is inside a try/except block, and there is an execution path going through an exception which doesn't initialize your result.

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It actually is that simple –  user195488 Jun 21 '10 at 16:42

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