Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I'm working on TeXmaker for the first time and I don't understand how to leave a blanket line inside a centered enviroment. If I write

1 Hello,\\
2
3 world!

Also in the .dvi file there is a blank line between Hello and world. But the code

1 \begin{center}
2 Hello,\\
3
4 world!
5 \end{center}

just ignores the third line and gives in output:

Hello,
world!

centered, of course. How can I put a blank line between the two words? I know I can simply close the center tag when I need a blank line, but having another alternative would be great :)

share|improve this question
    
What you have done was breaking line hard (\`) and starting new paragraph (free line). I recommend you to use \` command only when you need to a you know what to do. In other cases use free line to start new paragraph, or \par command (first way looks better in source code) or \linebreak to break long line in one paragraph. –  Crowley Jun 23 '10 at 19:20
    
Uhm,that solution is similar to the ~\\, isn't it? I actually can't find a good guide containing this solutions, so thank you for you advices –  dostoevskij Jun 23 '10 at 19:37

2 Answers 2

up vote 3 down vote accepted

Try using a hard space (i.e., a tilde) and a linebreak in the blank line.

1 \begin{center}
2 Hello,\\
3 ~\\
4 world!
5 \end{center}
share|improve this answer
    
it works, thanks :) –  dostoevskij Jun 21 '10 at 16:14
    
Another way to achieve that is Hello\\[2ex] World! (1ex is height of glyph - letter - x. You can use any unit used in typography -cm, mm, in, pt,...-) Or \vspace{2ex} –  Crowley Jun 23 '10 at 19:15

Maybe changing parskip only in certain environments might be what you want:

http://stackoverflow.com/questions/2180567/change-parskip-only-inside-enumerate-itemize-environment

share|improve this answer

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.