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Hey all. Basically, I need "(this)" in my function to correspond to this selection:

$(".widget .portfolio img")

But I want alternative ways of running this function, one when it is cilcked, and one in intervals, like this:

function cycle()
{
  var poo = $(this).attr("id");
  $(".poo").html(poo);
}

    $(".widget .portfolio img").click(function() {
        cycle();
    });

    setInterval(function() {
        cycle();

    }, 4000);

});

The problem is that when the interval runs, the function's value of "(this)" is that of the setInterval function - but I want it to be the selection I said above... if I could do something like this, it would be ideal:

setInterval(function() {
        cycle($(".widget .portfolio img"));
        ...

I think I just need a simple something in the function... any ideas? Thanks in advance :)

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Thanks for your comments everyone :) They all work great -- I've gone with the answer with the example that I have gone with. Thanks again. –  Tim Jun 21 '10 at 16:23
    
You've gone with the answer you've gone with? ^_^ –  Design by Adrian Dec 16 '11 at 11:52
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3 Answers 3

up vote 1 down vote accepted

pass a reference (or a jquery selector) to cycle.

function cycle(obj)
{
  var poo = obj.attr("id");
  $(".poo").html(poo);
}

or

function cycle(sel)
{
  var poo = $(sel).attr("id");
  $(".poo").html(poo);
}

then you can use either cycle($(".widget .portfolio img")) or cycle(".widget .portfolio img") according to which you prefer.

My preference would be passing a reference, as I could then do this:

$(".widget .portfolio img").click(function() {
        cycle($(this));
    });

    setInterval(function() {
        cycle($(".widget .portfolio img"));

    }, 4000);
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You can use call() or apply() or using jQuery 1.4+ jQuery.proxy().

Using call() / apply() (the only difference between these is passing arguments to the function). Every function can be called using call/apply, the first argument will be the context (this) for the function call, and the second/more arguments are the arguments to the function. apply() takes the function arguments as an array, where call() takes them individually.

var $imgs = $('.widget .portfolio img'), imgNum = -1;

setInterval(function() {
   imgNum = (imgNum + 1) % $imgs.length;
   // to simulate cycling through the items for instance?

   cycle.call($imgs.get(imgNum)); 
},4000);

jQuery.proxy()

This function is slightly different (and not really applicable to this situation), but can also be used to set the this context for a function. What proxy() does is take a function, and returns another function that calls the original function forcing its context to what you specify. Here's an example of using $.proxy() to map a call to always be in the context of the calling object.

share|improve this answer
    
thanks, but how exactly? –  Tim Jun 21 '10 at 16:00
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function cycle(me) 
{ 
  var poo = me.attr("id"); 
  $(".poo").html(poo); 
}; 

$(".widget .portfolio img").click(function() { 
        cycle($(this)); 
    }); 

setInterval('cycle($(".widget .portfolio img"))', 4000);
share|improve this answer
    
wish I woulda thought of that :) –  Jamiec Jun 21 '10 at 16:25
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