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I have this line of code which I want to concatenate -or at least solve the loop problem...

test = 1 - ("0." & thisnumber(0) & thisnumber(1) & thisnumber(2))

I want this to have a loop in it...

-Increasing thisnumber()

Until it gets to about 500,

Can some implement a loop into this?

Or suggest a way...

Thanks a lot..

James :)

EDIT:

So if I had values thisnumber(0) = 1, thisnumber(1) = 5, thisnumber(2) = 0, thisnumber(3) = 7... It would do 1 - 0.1507... (But I want a loop so it does all 500 without me typing them all out) -I'm wanting 1,000,000 so it would be a huge problem.

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3  
it is really hard to understand anything from this question –  Andrey Jun 21 '10 at 16:26
    
smells like homework... –  Greg D Jun 21 '10 at 16:31
    
Do you mean that you want to calculate 0 - 0.1234567890... where the i-th digit is the return value of a call to thisnumber(i)? This is probably better solved without string concatenation, and you also will not be able to get a precision of 500 decimal places. –  0xA3 Jun 21 '10 at 16:32
    
I want the brackets to be looped, simple. -Too increase the array position... Can anyone help? –  Steven Tilling Jun 21 '10 at 16:58
    
@All: as per James' comment further down the page, the real problem here is to find a value for pi to many decimal places without an overflow or, presumably, loss of precision... –  Dan Puzey Jun 21 '10 at 18:16

4 Answers 4

up vote 0 down vote accepted

Something like this, maybe... (Excuse my VB syntax, it's been a while)

dim num as double = 0.0

for i as integer = 0 to 500
    num += thisnumber(i) / (10 ^ (i + 1))
next 

test = 1 - num

However... this will overflow way before you get to 500 digits, and I still have to wonder why your input is in this format in the first place...

EDIT: based on the OP's comments, here's a version minus overflow...

dim num as double = 0.0
dim factor as double = 1.0;

for i as integer = 0 to 500
    factor /= 10
    num += thisnumber(i) * factor
next 

test = 1 - num

This version won't overflow, but you'll run into decimal precision issues along the way. If, as the OP suggests, this is about finding Pi to high accuracy, there are probably better ways - but without knowing the actual problem, I'm not sure it's worth going into detail.

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Yeah thats what I mean, I'm doing it my way to stop it overflowing... -Getting Pi to alot of Dp's. So thanks, but no thanks :P –  Steven Tilling Jun 21 '10 at 17:22
    
But you can't stop the overflow by using your loop method: if you want it as a number to "lots of DPs," you're going to need something other than a standard data type. Also, if that's what you're trying to do, you should perhaps try posting that as your question so that people know what your real problem is. –  Dan Puzey Jun 21 '10 at 18:15
    
Also: you're going to run into decimal precision issues anyway, so I suspect you're not going to find the solution you're after. I'll post an edit that avoids the overflow in a sec, but you'll be still screwed on accuracy... –  Dan Puzey Jun 21 '10 at 18:18
    
Even the second version would not yield the desired result. I guess it makes no difference whether you iterate from 1 to 20 or from 1 to 500... –  0xA3 Jun 21 '10 at 20:18

The string concatenation is super confusing here. I think you're actually trying to do arithmetic, yes? You want a loop in which you're incrementing both the integer you pass to thisnumber() and the power of ten you're dividing by. So you have 1 - thisnumber(0)/10 - thisnumber(1)/100 / thisnumber(2)/1000 and so on. You should be able to do that with a loop once you stop thinking about building a string.

Update: what type are you planning to use for test? Do you understand how many decimal places of precision it can hold if it's a number? If it's a string, what are you going to do with it once you have it?

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I want the brackets to be looped, simple. -Too increase the array position... Can you help? –  Steven Tilling Jun 21 '10 at 16:59
2  
@James: stop posting the same comment to every response! If people aren't answering your question correctly then maybe it's not as simple as you assume... –  Dan Puzey Jun 21 '10 at 17:14
    
(And @Kate, I'm not sure it's a string concatenation as such... integer-concatenation, ish?) –  Dan Puzey Jun 21 '10 at 17:16
1  
He starts with "0." and then uses & repeatedly, that's going to make a string. Not that it makes any sense... –  Kate Gregory Jun 21 '10 at 17:53

Use a DO ... WHILE loop

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Dim d As Integer
Dim val As String
val = "0."
For d = 0 To 500
    val = val & d
Next d
test = 1 - Convert.ToDouble(val)
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Ok, thats alright But, I'd have to right it out (till 500) I want it to do it all. -inside the 'test =' –  Steven Tilling Jun 21 '10 at 16:46
1  
@James Rattray: None of the .NET built-in data types will give you precision of 500 decimal places. May I ask why you need such a high precision? –  0xA3 Jun 21 '10 at 16:51
    
Well are you wanting test to equal += to the right of test? Right now, the way you had it, would keep replacing the value of test in which case the final number would be equal to 1-(0.500501502). At least that is what it seems like. what exactly do you want. –  Kyra Jun 21 '10 at 16:53
    
I want the brackets to be looped, simple. -Too increase the array position... And I want to get Pi to 500... –  Steven Tilling Jun 21 '10 at 17:00
    
So if I had values thisnumber(0) = 1, thisnumber(1) = 5, thisnumber(2) = 0, thisnumber(3) = 7... It would do 1 - 0.1507. –  Steven Tilling Jun 21 '10 at 17:06

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