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So given the following template functions with partial specialization

template<typename T>
void foo(vector<T> &in) {
    cout << "vector" << endl;
}

template<typename T>
void foo(T &in) {
    cout << "scalar" << endl;
}

int main(int arc, char *argv[]) {
    vector<double> a;
    double b;

    foo(a);
    foo(b);
    return 0;
}

I have no problem compiling with g++ 3.4.6 and get the expected output:

vector
scalar

Now, if I add a second template parameter:

template<class U, typename T>
void foo2(vector<T> &in) {
    U a;
    cout << "vector" << endl;
}

template<class U, typename T>
void foo2(T &in) {
    U a;
    cout << "scalar" << endl;
}

and call it with the following:

int main(int arc, char *argv[]) {
    vector<double> a;
    double b;

    foo2<double>(a);
    foo2<double>(b);
    return 0;
}

When I try to compile it GCC 3.4.6 gives me an ambiguous overload error.

error: call of overloaded `foo2(std::vector<double, std::allocator<double> >&)' is ambiguous
note: candidates are: void foo2(std::vector<T, std::allocator<_T2> >&) [with U = double, T = double]
note:                 void foo2(T&) [with U = double, T = std::vector<double, std::allocator<double> >]

I fail to see how the second template parameter now makes the overload ambiguous. As far as I can tell the vector version should still be more specialized. Is this just a bug in 3.4? Is there a workaround?

For the record the code works in gcc 4.1 without issue. Unfortunately some of our tools are still tied to 3.4 so that upgrading isn't the solution.

Thanks.

share|improve this question
    
Does gcc 3.4 work properly when you explicitly give all of the template arguments? – andand Jun 21 '10 at 17:36
    
Also, the title of this is misleading. Partial ordering has a specific mathematical meaning. What you're talking about is partial template specification. – andand Jun 21 '10 at 17:39
3  
Further, it's not even partial specialization. Only classes can be partially specialized. Template functions are overloaded. – Cogwheel Jun 21 '10 at 17:47
    
@andand I tried explicitly giving both template arguments. Strangely it removed the ambiguity error but it always selected the void foo2(T &in) form. i.e foo2<double,vector<double> >() reports scalar. Thanks for the suggestion. As for calling this partial ordering; this is what all the relevant searches I found called it. Not quite sure what else I would call it. Perhaps template function overload resolution? – asinclair Jun 21 '10 at 23:23
up vote 2 down vote accepted

This seems to be related to this defect which is fixed in the latest version of the compiler. Workarounds are to explicitly set all arguments of the template or to use functor instead:

template<typename U>
struct foo2 {
    template<typename T>
    void operator()( std::vector<T> &in ) {
        U a;
        cout << "vector" << endl;
    }
    template<typename T>
    void operator()( T& in ) {
        U a;
        cout << "scalar" << endl;
    }
};

int main(int arc, char *argv[]) {
    vector<double> a;
    double b;

    foo2<double>()(a);
    foo2<double>()(b);
    return 0;
}
share|improve this answer
    
Thank you. I saw that bug report during my searches but it didn't really give me a work around. Using the functor seems to have solved my problem though. Again, thanks. – asinclair Jun 21 '10 at 23:06

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