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I was hoping someone with better math capabilities would assist me in figuring out the total possibilities for a string given it's length and character set.

i.e. [a-f0-9]{6}

What are the possibilities for this pattern of random characters?

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2  
Do you want a list? –  mcandre Jun 21 '10 at 18:24
1  
That looks like 3 bytes to me. –  Peter Jaric Jun 21 '10 at 18:25
    
@mcandre I don't need a list, but if your able to suggest simple code that could create such a list that would be great. –  Andre Jun 21 '10 at 18:29
1  
BTW to help with any of your googling efforts I think this is a Discrete Mathematics topic called permutations: google.com/… –  AaronLS Jun 21 '10 at 18:33
    
@AaronLS: Doesn't look like a permutation problem to me. –  GregS Jun 22 '10 at 1:45

5 Answers 5

up vote 9 down vote accepted

It is equal to the number of characters in the set raised to 6th power. In Python (3.x) interpreter:

>>> len("0123456789abcdef")
16
>>> 16**6
16777216
>>>

EDIT 1: Why 16.7 million? Well, 000000 ... 999999 = 10^6 = 1M, 16/10 = 1.6 and

>>> 1.6**6
16.77721600000000 

* EDIT 2:* To create a list in Python, do: print(['{0:06x}'.format(i) for i in range(16**6)]) However, this is too huge. Here is a simpler, shorter example:

>>> ['{0:06x}'.format(i) for i in range(100)]
['000000', '000001', '000002', '000003', '000004', '000005', '000006', '000007', '000008', '000009', '00000a', '00000b', '00000c', '00000d', '00000e', '00000f', '000010', '000011', '000012', '000013', '000014', '000015', '000016', '000017', '000018', '000019', '00001a', '00001b', '00001c', '00001d', '00001e', '00001f', '000020', '000021', '000022', '000023', '000024', '000025', '000026', '000027', '000028', '000029', '00002a', '00002b', '00002c', '00002d', '00002e', '00002f', '000030', '000031', '000032', '000033', '000034', '000035', '000036', '000037', '000038', '000039', '00003a', '00003b', '00003c', '00003d', '00003e', '00003f', '000040', '000041', '000042', '000043', '000044', '000045', '000046', '000047', '000048', '000049', '00004a', '00004b', '00004c', '00004d', '00004e', '00004f', '000050', '000051', '000052', '000053', '000054', '000055', '000056', '000057', '000058', '000059', '00005a', '00005b', '00005c', '00005d', '00005e', '00005f', '000060', '000061', '000062', '000063']
>>> 

EDIT 3: As a function:

def generateAllHex(numDigits):
    assert(numDigits > 0)
    ceiling = 16**numDigits
    for i in range(ceiling):
        formatStr = '{0:0' + str(numDigits) + 'x}'
        print(formatStr.format(i))

This will take a while to print at numDigits = 6. I recommend dumping this to file instead like so:

def generateAllHex(numDigits, fileName):
    assert(numDigits > 0)
    ceiling = 16**numDigits
    with open(fileName, 'w') as fout:
        for i in range(ceiling):
            formatStr = '{0:0' + str(numDigits) + 'x}'
            fout.write(formatStr.format(i))
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So 16^6? Tried that and to be honest the number seemed a little high. @Hamish Grubijan That's the number I got, but it seemed high. –  Andre Jun 21 '10 at 18:27
1  
Well, 6 digits in decimal give you 000000 through 999999 (one million). 6 digits in Hex give you up to ffffff = ~ 16.7 million –  Hamish Grubijan Jun 21 '10 at 18:29
    
@Andre In hexadecimal FFFFFF is 16777215, and since 0000000 is also a possibility then Hamish's answer is correct at 16777216. –  AaronLS Jun 21 '10 at 18:30
1  
@Andre: just for perspective, US local phone numbers match [0-9]{7} and - ignoring reserved sequences - there are 10^7 of those per area code. Combinatorics mount up quickly. –  msw Jun 21 '10 at 18:38

If you are just looking for the number of possibilities, the answer is (charset.length)^(length). If you need to actually generate a list of the possibilities, just loop through each character, recursively generating the remainder of the string.

e.g.

void generate(char[] charset, int length)
{
  generate("",charset,length);
}

void generate(String prefix, char[] charset, int length)
{
  for(int i=0;i<charset.length;i++)
  {
    if(length==1)
      System.out.println(prefix + charset[i]);
    else
      generate(prefix+i,charset,length-1);
  }
}
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The number of possibilities is the size of your alphabet, to the power of the size of your string (in the general case, of course)

assuming your string size is 4: _ _ _ _ and your alphabet = { 0 , 1 }: there are 2 possibilities to put 0 or 1 in the first place, second place and so on. so it all sums up to: alphabet_size^String_size

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2  
I think you've got that backwards -- it's the size of the alphabet to the power of the size of the string. –  Jacob Mattison Jun 21 '10 at 18:29
    
yep.. I did.. Edited –  Protostome Jun 21 '10 at 18:34

first: 000000 last: ffffff

This matches hexadecimal numbers.

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For any given set of possible values, the number of permutations is the number of possibilities raised to the power of the number of items.

In this case, that would be 16 to the 6th power, or 16777216 possibilities.

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