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Is is good practice to use domain objects as keys for maps (or "get" methods), or is it better to just use the id of the domain object?

It's simpler to explain with an example. Let's say I have Person class, a Club class, and a Membership class (that connects the other two). I.e.,

public class Person {
    private int id; // primary key
    private String name;
}

public class Club {
    private String name; // primary key
}

public class Membership {
    private Person person;
    private Club club;
    private Date expires;
}

Or something like that. Now, I want to add a method getMembership to Club. The question is, should this method take a Person object:

public Membership getMembership(Person person);

or, the id of a person:

public Membership getMembership(int personId);

Which is most idiomatic, which is most convenient, which is most suitable?

Edit: Many very good answers. I went with not exposing the id, because the "Person" (as you might have realized, my real domain does not have anything to do with people and clubs...) instances are easily available, but for now it is internally stored in a HashMap hashed on the id - but at least I am exposing it correctly in the interface.

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Excellent question. –  Uri Jun 21 '10 at 20:12
2  
Avoid exposing your private parts to other entities. –  Dave Jarvis Jun 22 '10 at 1:46
    
@DaveJarvis Words to live by. –  Random Human Jul 30 '12 at 16:28

13 Answers 13

up vote 4 down vote accepted

Don't use the id's man, this is just a bad idea for all the reasons mentioned. You'll lock yourself into a design. Let me give an example.

Right now you define you're Membership as a mapping between Clubs to People. Rightfully, your Membership should be a map of Clubs to "Members", but you are assuming that all Members are People and that since all of the people id's are unique you think you can just use the ID.

But what if in the future you want to extend your membership concept to "family memberships", for which you create a Family table and a Family class. In good OO fashion you extract an interface of Family and Person called Member. As long as both classes implement the equals and hashCode methods properly, no other code will have to be touched. Personally, I would have defined the Member interface right up front.

public interface Member {
}

public class Person implements Member {
    private int id; // primary key
    private String name;
}

public class Family implements Member {
   private int id;
   private String name;
}

public class Club {
    private String name; // primary key
}

public class Membership {
   private Member member;
   private Club club;
   private Date expires;
}

If, you had used ID's in your interface, you will either need to enforce cross-table uniqueness of key values, or maintain two separate Maps and forgo the nice polymorphic interface stuff.

Believe me, unless you are writing one-off, disposable applications, you want to avoid using ID's in your interface.

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This is a very compelling argument. Also, following this practice implies that Person does not need to expose a getId() method at all! –  waxwing Jun 24 '10 at 8:39

Assuming this is a database ID or something used just for indexing (rather than something like an SSN), then in an ideal system, the presence of an ID is an implementation detail.

As an implementation detail, I would prefer to hide it in the interface of other domain objects. Thus, membership involves, fundamentally, individuals rather than numbers.

Of course, I'd make sure I implemented hashCode and equals() and documented well what they meant.

In that case, I would explicitly document that the equality of two Person objects is determined solely based on ID. This is somewhat a risky proposition, but makes code more readable if you can ensure it. I feel more comfortable making it when my objects are immutable, so I would not actually end up with two Person objects with the same ID but different names in the lifetime of the program.

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Immutability alone wouldn't ensure the lack of multiple instances with different values. It only ensures that, once created, an instance's properties will not change. –  Angelo Genovese Jun 21 '10 at 20:02
    
@Angelo: I agree. However, I'm assuming that all domain objects are either loaded from the database or are created and immediately saved in. –  Uri Jun 21 '10 at 20:12
    
+1 on equality and hash code. For updates, you care more that you have the same "object" from the backing store (db / cache) rather than if the object's data is the same. In fact you probably want the data to be different. For inserts, it's helpful to have a "new" object that has an invalid id so you know the object is new and actually needs to be inserted. –  AngerClown Jun 22 '10 at 14:37

I think the first case would be considered "purer" in the sense that the getMembership method might require more specific data from the person itself other than its id (Let's assume you do not know the internals of the getMembership method, even though this makes little sense since it's most likely in the same domain).

If it turns out that it actually requires data from the Person entity then it will not require a DAO or factory for the person in question.

This can be easily called if your language and/or ORM allows you to use proxy objects (and if you have a convenient way to create these proxies).

But lets be honest. If you're inquiring about some membership of a person, you most likely already have this Person instance in memory at hand when you call this method.

Further down the road in the "infrastructure land" there's also this notion about implementation details which Uri already mentioned while I was writing this answer (damn, that was fast bro'!). To be specific, what if you decided that this 'Person' concept suddenly has a composite primary key/identifier in the underlying database... Would you now use an identifier class? Perhaps use that proxy we were talking about?

TL;DR version

Using ID's is really easier in the short run, but if you're already using a solid ORM, I see no reason not to use proxies or some other means to express the object oriented identity of an Entity which doesn't leak implementation details.

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1  
How do you get a Person? At some point you may want a getPerson(int personId) function [vs getPerson(String name)]. Not a vote against being "pure", but just a note that it can be difficult not to expose implementation details somewhere. –  AngerClown Jun 22 '10 at 14:28
    
As I said, you will most likely have some kind of Proxy provider or injected Person in the object that requires it as a dependency. It seems to me that this is beyond the scope of this question. –  Denis 'Alpheus' Cahuk Jun 22 '10 at 14:30

If you are really practicing object oriented design, then you want to invoke the idea of information hiding. As soon as you start hanging internal field types of the person object in the public interface of the membership object's methods, you start forcing external developers (users) of your objects to start learning all kinds of information about what a person object is, and how it is stored, and what kind of ID it has.

Better yet, since a person can have memberships, why don't you just hang the "getMemberships" method onto the person class. It seems much more logical to ask a person which memberships they have, than to ask a "membership" which clubs a given person may belong to...

Edit - since the OP has updated to indicate that it is the membership itself that he is interested in, and not just used as a relation between Person and Club, I'm updating my answer.

Long story short, the "Club" class that you are defining, you are now asking to behave as a "club roster". A club has a roster, it isn't is a roster. A roster could have several features, including ways to look up persons belonging to the club. In addition to looking up a person by their club ID, you might want to look them up by SSN, name, join date, etc.. To me, this says there is a method on class "Club" called getRoster(), which returns a data structure that can lookup all the persons in the club. Call it a collection. The question then becomes, can you use the methods on pre-existing collections classes to fulfill the needs you have defined so far, or do you need to create a custom collection subclass to provide the appropriate method to find the membership record.

Since your class heirarchy is most likely backed by a database, and you are probably taking about loading info out of the database, and don't necessarily want to get the entire collection just to get one membership, you may want to create a new class. This class could be called as I said "Roster". You would get the instance of it from the getRoster() call on class "club". You would add "searching" methods to the class based on any search criteria you wanted that was "publicly available" information about the person.. name, clubID, personID, SSN, etc...

My original answer only applies if the "membership" is purely a relation to indicate which clubs which persons belong to.

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Exactly this. Don't make the users of your classes have to understand what the keys are, what the IDs are, etc. If a membership logically belongs to a Person than this is what your method interface should be. –  matt b Jun 21 '10 at 20:18
    
Possibly it is better suited on Person. But let's say a person is generally a member of hundreds of clubs, then you want a getMembership(Club club) on Person instead, and you have the same problem, only reversed. –  waxwing Jun 21 '10 at 20:24
    
I see the point of what you are asking now. Editing answer appropriately. –  Zak Jun 21 '10 at 20:33
    
Well if you add "getMemberships" to the Person object, now your Person class is coupled with the data source used for memberships. –  Frank Schwieterman Jun 21 '10 at 23:47
    
Its a nice idea but not true- using object oriented language features does not make your code "more object oriented". –  Frank Schwieterman Jun 21 '10 at 23:48

IMO, I think it very much depends on the flow of the application - do you have the Person available when you want to get the Membership details? If yes, go with:
public Membership getMembership(Person person);

Also, I don't see any reason why the Club cannot keep track of memberships based on the Person's ID and not the actual object - I think that would mean you don't need to implement the hashCode() and equals() methods. (Although that is always a good best-practice).

As Uri said, you should document the deceleration that two Person objects are equal if their ID is equal.

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Whoa. Back up a sec here. The getMembership() method doesn't belong in Club. It belongs to the set of all memberships, which you haven't implemented.

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As described by others: use the object.

I work on a system where we had some old code that used int to represent transaction ids. Guess what? We started running out of ids because we used int.

Changing to long or BigNumber proved tricky because people had become very inventive with naming. Some used

int tranNum

some used

int transactionNumber

some used

int trannNum

(complete with spelling mistakes).

Some people got really inventive...

It was a mess and sorting it out was a nightmare. I ended up gping through all of the code manually and converting to a TransactionNumber object.

Hide the details wherever possible.

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I would typically stick with less is more. The less information required to invoke your method the better. If you know the ID, only require the ID.

If you want, provide extra overloads which accept extra parameters, such as the entire class.

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Why a down vote? I'm curius to see why you think my advise is bad? –  Nate Jun 21 '10 at 20:35
    
A simple ID is also not generally as type-safe. There is nothing necessarily enforcing that only the IDs of Persons have been added to the map. Primitives have no contextual information. I didn't down-vote you, but it isn't as object-oriented and it doesn't provide an abstraction over the details of what equality means for that class. –  Matt H Jun 22 '10 at 0:27

If you already have the object, there's no reason to pull out the ID to get a hash key.

As long as the IDs are always unique, implement hashCode() to return the ID, and implement equals() as well.

Odds are every time you'll need the Membership, you'll already have the Person, so it saves code and confusion later.

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Implementing hashcode to return the id is problematic when the object changes from transient to persisted. It will break the hashcode/equals contract because suddenly it'll be returning different results. And if at that point it's inside a collection, it may cause problems. –  cherouvim Jun 21 '10 at 20:06

First of all I'd put any getters of such nature inside a DAO (and not on the model). Then I'd use the entity itself as a parameter, and what happens inside the method is an implementation detail.

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In my case the Membership objects are loaded from the database at the same time as the Club objects. So calling getMembership(..) does not issue anything to the database - it would just access an internal state in Club. –  waxwing Jun 21 '10 at 20:22

Unless there's a significant benefit derived elsewhere, it can be said that keys in map should single-valued things, if at all possible. That said, through paying attention to equals() and hashCode() you can make any object work as key, but equals() and hashCode() aren't very pleasing things to have to pay attention to. You'll be happier sticking to IDs as keys.

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I would probably use IDs. Why? By taking IDs, I'm making safer assumptions about the caller.

If I have an ID, how much work is it to get the Person? Might be 'easy', but it does require hitting a datastore, which is slow...

If I have Person object, how much work is it to get the ID? Simple member access. Fast and available.

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Actually, what I would do is call it by id, but refactoring a bit the original design:

public class Person {
    private int id; // primary key
    private String name;
}

public class Club {
    private String name; // primary key
    private Collection<Membership> memberships;
    public Membership getMembershipByPersonId(int id);
}

public class Membership {
    private Date expires;
    private Person person;
}

or

public class Person {
    private int id; // primary key
    private String name;
    private Membership membership;
    public Membership getMembership();
}

public class Club {
    private String name; // primary key
    private Collection<Person> persons;
    public Person getPersonById(int id);
}

public class Membership {
    private Date expires;
}
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