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I am trying to save the time in the database for when a user add an entry. Every time I run the time() function it prints (or returns) 1277155717 which represents 1969.

I was wondering if there is a way to save the time to the database in a way that it represents the actual date today at this moment.

I am using the function

/* Works out the time since the entry post, takes a an argument in unix time (seconds) */
function time_since($original) {
    // array of time period chunks
    $chunks = array(
        array(60 * 60 * 24 * 365 , 'year'),
        array(60 * 60 * 24 * 30 , 'month'),
        array(60 * 60 * 24 * 7, 'week'),
        array(60 * 60 * 24 , 'day'),
        array(60 * 60 , 'hour'),
        array(60 , 'minute'),
    );

    $today = time(); /* Current unix time  */
    $since = $today - $original;

    // $j saves performing the count function each time around the loop
    for ($i = 0, $j = count($chunks); $i < $j; $i++) {

        $seconds = $chunks[$i][0];
        $name = $chunks[$i][1];

        // finding the biggest chunk (if the chunk fits, break)
        if (($count = floor($since / $seconds)) != 0) {
            // DEBUG print "<!-- It's $name -->\n";
            break;
        }
    }

    $print = ($count == 1) ? '1 '.$name : "$count {$name}s";

    if ($i + 1 < $j) {
        // now getting the second item
        $seconds2 = $chunks[$i + 1][0];
        $name2 = $chunks[$i + 1][1];

        // add second item if it's greater than 0
        if (($count2 = floor(($since - ($seconds * $count)) / $seconds2)) != 0) {
            $print .= ($count2 == 1) ? ', 1 '.$name2 : ", $count2 {$name2}s";
        }
    }
    return $print;
}

In order to display the number of minutes, years, months, etc since the comment was posted and it is returning (40 years, 6 months ago) when I pass the value of the function time();

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1  
The timestamp 1277155717 is Monday, June 21st 2010, 21:28:37 (GMT) –  Chief17 Jun 21 '10 at 21:41
    
yeah, then what is the problem with the function above (thanks for verifying this btw) –  user220755 Jun 21 '10 at 21:45
    
what makes you sink 1277155717 is some time in 1969? –  jigfox Jun 21 '10 at 21:48
    
No i did not say it is sometime in 1969, i said, that what it prints. i know it is not sometime in 1969 :) –  user220755 Jun 21 '10 at 22:01

3 Answers 3

up vote 1 down vote accepted

Why won't you just use sql's timestamp type, i.e.

INSERT INTO posts (content, created) VALUES ("Sample post", NOW());
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I would like to be able to use the php function (time()). However it is returning 1277155717 which is not the number it should be returning for the current time. I am pretty sure the function above is correct so it should not say 40 years 6 months –  user220755 Jun 21 '10 at 21:40
1  
This IS "the true number it should be returning for the current time". Check unixtimestamp.com for the current timestamp. –  cypher Jun 21 '10 at 21:43
    
then can you help me check what is wrong with the function above please :) ? –  user220755 Jun 21 '10 at 21:45
    
You have $since with the number of seconds passed since some event, right? So it's $since/60 seconds, $since/3600 minutes, $since/86400 hours, $since/2073600 days and $since/756864000 years. –  cypher Jun 21 '10 at 21:54

Are you wanting a timestamp or the actual formatted time?'

If it's the latter, try this:

$time = date("h:i:s");
share|improve this answer
    
timestamp not the formatted time –  user220755 Jun 21 '10 at 21:38

Be very careful before you start implementing your own date calculations. There are always weird cases to deal with. In your example, it looks to me like you aren't taking into account daylight savings time or leap years. I don't know if that matters to you.

Your chances are better if you use some library to do the date calculations for you. I would suggest you start by looking at the date_diff function in PHP. I don't know whether it handles daylight savings and leap years, but that's where I would start.

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