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I'm getting a compile time error

'UserQuery.ReturnInt(UserQuery.Foo)': not all code paths return a value

Unless I'm not seeing something in the code, the switch statement should return 0 as the default value so all code paths do return a value.

enum Foo
{
    Bar,
    Zoo,
    Boo
}

void Main()
{
    Foo test = Foo.Bar;

    Console.WriteLine (ReturnInt(test));
}

int ReturnInt(Foo test) {

    int someOtherValue = 4; // <---Value may change depending on X

    switch (test)
    {
        case Foo.Bar:
            if (someOtherValue > 20)
                return 1;
            break;

        case Foo.Zoo:
            if (someOtherValue == 5)
                return 4;
            break;

        case Foo.Boo:
            if (someOtherValue == 2)
                return 7;
            break;

        default:
            return 0;
    }
}
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4 Answers 4

up vote 6 down vote accepted

Any of the other switch blocks will just hit the "break" statement depending on the value of "someOtherValue". You have no return statement after the switch, so any of the situations where the "break" is hit will not return a value.

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Good spot! Can't believe I missed that. –  Vince Panuccio Jun 22 '10 at 1:21

You need a return statement at the end method. My guess is that you want it to return 0.
You've set up the conditions in the switch statement which prevent it hitting the return statement in each.

case Foo.Bar:
            if (someOtherValue > 20)
                return 1;
            break;

In this statement is test equals Foo.Bar and someOtherValue <= 20, then this return statement will never be reached. This is true with all your current switch statements (except the default one). Even if the business logic is setup to never have that happen, the compiler doesn't know that, and so it will tell you that not all paths return a value.

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I would change it so that there is only one return point, which I like for clarity reasons anyhow. :-)

using System;
using System.Collections.Generic;
using System.Linq;
using System.Text;

namespace HelloWorld
{
    class Program
    {
        static int ReturnInt(Foo test)
        {
            int retVal = 0; // defaults to 0

            int someOtherValue = 4; // <---Value may change depending on X


            switch (test)
            {
                case Foo.Bar:

                        if (someOtherValue > 20)
                            retVal = 1;
                        break;

                case Foo.Zoo:

                        if (someOtherValue == 5)
                            retVal = 4;
                        break;

                case Foo.Boo:

                        if (someOtherValue == 2)
                            retVal = 7;
                        break;

                default:
                        retVal = 0;
                        break;

            }
            return retVal;
        }

        enum Foo
        {
            Bar,
            Zoo,
            Boo
        }

        static void Main(string[] args)
        {
            Foo test = Foo.Bar;

            Console.WriteLine(ReturnInt(test));
        }
    }
}
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2 things:

1) Code-wise, if any of the break statements execute, then the switch statement will be exited and no value will be returned.

2) Conceptually, you say that the switch statement should return a default value of 0, which is true, but the variable you are switching on is test. The switch statement will return 0 for any values test that aren't listed, e.g. Foo.Park or Foo.Library. If the switch statement matches any of the listed values, e.g. Foo.Bar, then only the code within that block will be executed. The switch statement will then be exited.

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