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Pros and cons of editing sharepoint master page in sharepoint designer or visual studio? Which one do you prefer

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3 Answers 3

SharePoint Designer

Pro:

  • WYSIWYG editing
  • Very fast turaround Edit/save/test

Con:

  • No Version control
  • Cumbersome reuse/deployment (Download/Upload)

Visual Studio

Pro:

  • Integration with Source Control
  • Deployment/Reuse via Feature/Solution framework

Con:

  • Pure source code editing
  • Cumbersome Edit/Deploy/Test cycle

SharePoint Designer & Visual Studio

My recommendation is to use SharePoint Designer to develop the master page on your development machine. Then save the MasterPage into a Visual Studio solution for deployment to Test/Production: Pro:

  • WYSIWYG editing
  • Very fast turaround Edit/save/test
  • Integration with Source Control
  • Deployment/Reuse via Feature/Solution framework

Con:

  • You need both tools, but SharePoint designer is free and this is in general the most efficient way of developing for SharePoint. Make what you can using SPD and the Web UI, then save it into a Visual Studio Solution for version control/deployment
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Nicely summarised. I have found that SPD sometimes does some peculiar things and I tend to use point and click to do basic things like adding sorting and paging but then work directly with the source code for additional functionality. –  David Clarke May 20 '13 at 4:12

For the most part I agree with what Per Jakobsen answered above. ESPECIALLY for SharePoint 2007.

Additional comments on the Pros/Cons of SharePoint Designer 2010:

I have actually had very good experiences with using SharePoint Designer exclusively for most of the "front end" work. Meaning, anything that is not a Server Side Web Part...

Regarding the "Cons" listed above:

Source Control - Setting up the SharePoint Version Controls for the document libraries that store the web pages you are working on does a fairly decent job of managing Source Control - which is handy when you are doing development work on the Production server. (see below)

Cumbersome reuse/deployment Not sure what is being referred to here, but I THINK it is in regards to developing code in one place, and then deploying that to a production server.

With permissions set correctly users are not impacted by development work because they will see the pages/code that is checked in, approved and viewable.

While I would normally hesitate to operate on production directly, there are many scenarios with SharePoint that require this - especially if you are editing XSLT data directly, etc. (what comes to mind off the top of my head are references to List or Library GUIDs and other "variables" that will be different between servers)

Cheers!

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Although I don't know why, SPD also changes your <%@ Register ... %> tags: it strips any leading "~" from the src="~/_controltemplates/..." attribute. You need to manually add them back in before publishing.

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