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In a comment on the answer to another question, someone said they weren't sure what functools.wraps was doing. So I'm asking this question so that there will be a record of it on StackOverflow for future reference: what does functools.wraps do, exactly?

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2 Answers 2

up vote 247 down vote accepted

When you use a decorator, you're replacing one function with another. In other words, if you have a decorator

def logged(func):
    def with_logging(*args, **kwargs):
        print func.__name__ + " was called"
        return func(*args, **kwargs)
    return with_logging

then when you say

@logged
def f(x):
   """does some math"""
   return x + x * x

it's exactly the same as saying

def f(x):
    """does some math"""
    return x + x * x
f = logged(f)

and your function f is replaced with the function with_logging. Unfortunately, this means that if you then say

print f.__name__

it will print with_logging because that's the name of your new function. In fact, if you look at the docstring for f, it will be blank because with_logging has no docstring, and so the docstring you wrote won't be there anymore. Also, if you look at the pydoc result for that function, it won't be listed as taking one argument x; instead it'll be listed as taking *args and **kwargs because that's what with_logging takes.

If using a decorator always meant losing this information about a function, it would be a serious problem. That's why we have functools.wraps. This takes a function used in a decorator and adds the functionality of copying over the function name, docstring, arguments list, etc. And since wraps is itself a decorator, the following code does the correct thing:

from functools import wraps
def logged(func):
    @wraps(func)
    def with_logging(*args, **kwargs):
        print func.__name__ + " was called"
        return func(*args, **kwargs)
    return with_logging

@logged
def f(x):
   """does some math"""
   return x + x * x

print f.__name__  # prints 'f'
print f.__doc__   # prints 'does some math'
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3  
Yep, I prefer to avoid the decorator module since functools.wraps is part of the standard library and thus doesn't introduce another external dependency. But the decorator module does indeed solve the help problem, which hopefully functools.wraps someday will as well. –  Eli Courtwright Nov 25 '09 at 16:37
3  
here's an example of what can happen if you don't use wraps: doctools tests can suddenly disappear. that's because doctools cannot find the tests in decorated functions unless something like wraps() has copied them across. –  andrew cooke Apr 24 '11 at 22:00
4  
+1 for a clear and descriptive answer. –  santiagobasulto Mar 13 '12 at 11:04
9  
why do we need functools.wraps for this job, shouldn't it just be part of the decorator pattern in the first place? when would you not want to use @wraps ? –  wim Jan 2 at 15:46
4  
@wim: I've written some decorators which do their own version of @wraps in order to perform various types of modification or annotation on the values copied over. Fundamentally, it's an extension of the Python philosophy that explicit is better than implicit and special cases aren't special enough to break the rules. (The code is much simpler and the language easier to understand if @wraps must be provided manually, rather than using some kind of special opt-out mechanism.) –  ssokolow Mar 29 at 22:58

I very often use classes, rather than functions, for my decorators. I was having some trouble with this because an object won't have all the same attributes that are expected of a function. For example, an object won't have the attribute __name__. I had a specific issue with this that was pretty hard to trace where Django was reporting the error "object has no attribute '__name__'". Unfortunately, for class-style decorators, I don't believe that @wrap will do the job. I have instead created a base decorator class like so:

class DecBase(object):
    func = None

    def __init__(self, func):
        self.__func = func

    def __getattribute__(self, name):
        if name == "func":
            return super(DecBase, self).__getattribute__(name)

        return self.func.__getattribute__(name)

    def __setattr__(self, name, value):
        if name == "func":
            return super(DecBase, self).__setattr__(name, value)

        return self.func.__setattr__(name, value)

This class proxies all the attribute calls over to the function that is being decorated. So, you can now create a simple decorator that checks that 2 arguments are specified like so:

class process_login(DecBase):
    def __call__(self, *args):
        if len(args) != 2:
            raise Exception("You can only specify two arguments")

        return self.func(*args)
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