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While studying C# in ASP.net I have trouble understanding several classes. In which scenario should I use the following classes private,public,protected,abstract,static,sealed ?

It would be better if someone can explain these with easy examples.

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closed as not a real question by this. __curious_geek, Igor Zevaka, Akash Kava, bmargulies, Graviton Jun 24 '10 at 5:13

It's difficult to tell what is being asked here. This question is ambiguous, vague, incomplete, overly broad, or rhetorical and cannot be reasonably answered in its current form. For help clarifying this question so that it can be reopened, visit the help center. If this question can be reworded to fit the rules in the help center, please edit the question.

14  
you need to read Beginning C# 2005/2008. We can't explain you the whole of C# encyclopedia. –  this. __curious_geek Jun 22 '10 at 6:51
2  
I think SO should now consider some guideline about asking question, we can not teach anyone "how to program" here or explain what already exists in MSDN or help tutorials. –  Akash Kava Jun 22 '10 at 8:14
    
I suggest you read a little about polymorphism @ msdn.microsoft.com/en-us/library/ms173152%28v=VS.80%29.aspx for example –  KroaX Jun 22 '10 at 19:32
    
Thank you so much for your suggestions. I did not know that the basic questions can not be asked in Stack Overflow. And I am very sorry to ask a very basic question to all of you. –  Hoque Jun 22 '10 at 22:30
    
Some of us are more than happy to answer these basic questions. There's no such thing as a stupid question, only stupid answers ;) –  Eltariel Jun 23 '10 at 1:11

8 Answers 8

up vote 18 down vote accepted

Those are not classes.

private, protected and public are access modifiers. They indicate which other code can see the code they affect:

public class Foo
{
    private int _myOwn = 1;
    protected int _mineAndChildren = 2;
    public int _everyOnes = 3;
}

public class Bar : Foo
{
    public void Method()
    {
        _myOwn = 2; // Illegal - can't access private member
        _mineAndChildren = 3; // Works
        _everyOnes = 4; // Works
    }
}

public class Unrelated
{
    public void Method()
    {
        Foo instance = new Foo();
        instance._myOwn = 2; // Illegal - can't access private member
        instance._mineAndChildren = 3; // Illegal
        instance._everyOnes = 4; // Works
    }
}

An abstract class is one that may contain abstract members. An abstract member has no implementation, so all derived classes must implement the abstract members.

A sealed class cannot be inherited. A static class is sealed, but also can only contain static members.

I suggest you start with "Getting Started with Visual C#. This is a very basic question.

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How does _everyOnes work in the Unrelated class? You would need an instance of either Foo or Bar to access the _everyOnes field. –  lxalln Jun 22 '10 at 9:27
    
@CnTwo: good catch. Copy-and-paste error. –  John Saunders Jun 22 '10 at 10:25
    
Thank you so much for examples with explanation. –  Hoque Jun 22 '10 at 22:21

public, private and protected aren't classes, they're access modifiers. They change what is allowed to access the classes that you decorate with them. They apply to classes as well as the members of classes.

  • public items can be seen from anywhere
  • private classes can only be seen from within the same file
  • private members of classes can only be seen within that class
  • protected members are visible from within the class and its descendants
  • internal classes are public within the same assembly.

The abstract keyword marks a class or method as having no implementation, and it must be overridden (with the override keyword) in a derived type before you can use it.

A sealed class cannot be inherited from.

Using the static keyword on a class member indicates that the member belongs to the class itself, rather than a specific instance of it. Marking a class as static imposes the restriction that all members of this class must also be static.

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3  
+1 for a great answer, sharp and to the point. Take caution with the static keyword... if you declare a variable as static in an ASP.NET web application then the same variable will be used for every single user of the application!! ... hence it would be very unwise to store username/password (sensitive data) in a static variable as other users will be able to see the data too! –  Dal Jun 22 '10 at 7:59
    
@Dal: note the reason for this - the static member belongs to the class. All requests, regardless of the user, would be using the same class, hence the same static member. –  John Saunders Jun 22 '10 at 10:26
    
@John - Yep fully understand, I learned from a hard lesson where I once stored a productID as a static var in a web app... didn't take long for all sorts of problems to occur (eg. products swaping information etc)... lesson learned :) –  Dal Jun 22 '10 at 12:29

private, public and protected indicate who can access members of a class. private means no one outside the class can see it. public means everyone can see it. protected is just like private, but subclasses can access it.

class Data
{
    private int counter; // only accessible to class functions
    protected int id;    // accessible to class and subclass functions
    public string name;  // accessible from all code
}

abstract means this is not a finished class - it is meant to be used as a base for subclasses. Often there are virtual functions in its definition, functions intended to be "filled in" by a subclass.

abstract class Window
{
    // cannot create objects of this class directly
    // need to create sub class
}

static on the class definition means there's only one global copy. It pretty much reverts the class to an old-style module. static against a member indicates that it is a global member within the class, there is not a different version for every object you make of that class.

static class Configuration
{
    // only one instance of the object
}

class Data
{
    private static int counter; // all Data objects access this one counter
    private int id;             // each Data object has a different id
}

sealed prevents subclasses being created; it can also be applied to individual functions to prevent them being overridden in a subclass.

sealed class TelephoneNumber
{
    // cannot create subclass of TelephoneNumber
}

class Address
{
    public sealed string FormatAddress()
    {
        // this function cannot be overridden on a subclass
    }
}
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I down't can comment your question but i have an little adition but importan information for you.

access modifiers are only an compiler-feature. every .net-programm can ignore this by using reflection and can access your private flaged classes and methodes.

An exampel:

using System;
using System.Collections.Generic;
using System.Text;
using System.Reflection;

namespace ReflectPrivateMembers
{
    class Program
    {
        static void Main(string[] args)
        {
            ConstructorInfo ci = typeof(Hello).GetConstructor(BindingFlags.NonPublic| BindingFlags.Instance ,null,System.Type.EmptyTypes,null);
            object helloObject = ci.Invoke(System.Type.EmptyTypes);
            MethodInfo[] helloObjectMethods = helloObject.GetType().GetMethods(BindingFlags.NonPublic | BindingFlags.Public | BindingFlags.DeclaredOnly| BindingFlags.Instance );

            foreach (MethodInfo mi in helloObjectMethods)
            {
                mi.Invoke(helloObject, System.Type.EmptyTypes);
            }
            Console.ReadLine();
        }
    }
    public class Hello
    {
        private Hello()
        {
            Console.WriteLine("Private Constructor");
        }
        public void HelloPub()
        {
            Console.WriteLine("Public Hello");
        }
        private void HelloPriv()
        {
            Console.WriteLine("Private Hello");
        }
    }
}

Source: Reflection with Private Members

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3  
Access modifies aren't a security mechanism, they're there to enforce programming patterns. Point taken, but still... –  tylerl Jun 22 '10 at 7:18

What you have there are modifiers, not types of classes.

private, public, and protected are Access Modifiers. They define how accessible you want the code to be.

Before looking into the other modifiers you have listed, I would suggest attempting to get a grasp on Object Oriented Programming. Here is a link full of good resources you can review.

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private,public,protected are the access modfier supported by c# language : here is the msdn link for more detail Access Modifiers

Abstract and Sealed Classes and Class Members

Static Classes and Static Class Members

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The first three are access modifiers, they can be applied to types and members. private means something can only be accessed from within its declaring type. protected means something can be accessed by inheritors of the declaring type, or by something in the type itself. public means something can be accessed from anywhere that has a valid reference to the declaring type.

The rest can also be applied to both types and members. abstract (on a member) means the member has no implementation (the implementation must be provided by inheritors of the type) or (on a type) that the type cannot be instantiated (only inherited). static (on a member) means that the member is shared statically by all callers, or (on a type) that the type can only contain static members and therefore cannot be instantiated (i.e. it doesn't have any instance members and therefore cannot serve any instances of itself). sealed (on an inherited virtual or abstract member) means that inheritors of the type cannot override the member, or (on a type) that the type cannot be inherited from.

There are a couple of other modifiers you should be aware of: internal is another access modifier that means that something can be accessed by anything within the same assembly (or project) as the declaring type.

Also, virtual (on a member) means that the member may optionally be overridden by an inheritor of the type, but supplies its own default implementation. partial (on a member) allows you to provide the signature of a member in one file, and the implementation in another, or (on a type) allows you to split the definition of a type across multiple code files.

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private and public refer to the visibility of the class outside the assembly (e.g. DLL or EXE) it lives in. protected is a modifier for methods, it means only classes that inherit from the declarator can call the method.

abstract identifies a class that cannot be created directly, and is designed only to provide a base for other classes.

Applied to methods, static means they can be accessed as part of the type, rather than an instance of the class:

class Bar {
    static void Foo() { ... }
    void Foo() { ... }
}

The first one can be called like this:

Bar.Foo();

The second one only like this:

Bar b = new Bar();
b.Foo();

Applied to classes, static limits the class to contain only static methods. It's more aesthetic than anything else, but it also helps the compiler.

The sealed modifier tells the compiler that a class cannot be inherited from.

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