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I have been a Java programmer for years but only iPhone/Obj-c for a few months. Every time I think I'm comfortable with the language something weird happens. Why does the following generate a "Incompatible types in initialisation" compile error? It seems so straight forward. 'double' is a primitive right?!?

-(void) testCalling{
   double myDoub = [self functionReturningDouble:3.0];
}


-(double) functionReturningDouble:(double) input{
   return 1.0;
}
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1  
Is the second method declared previously? Otherwise the return-type is assumed to be id. –  Georg Fritzsche Jun 22 '10 at 8:33
    
Also, it's good practice to declare private/internal methods in a class extension at the top of your implementation (.m) file. That practice removes position dependency on the implementation and use of private/internal methods. (Apple Docs: devworld.apple.com/mac/library/documentation/Cocoa/Conceptual/…) –  ohhorob Jun 30 '10 at 4:52

1 Answer 1

up vote 0 down vote accepted

Try to swap the method declarations. It may be a scope problem as Georg notices:

-(double) functionReturningDouble:(double) input{
    return 1.0;
}

-(void) testCalling{
    double myDoub = [self functionReturningDouble:3.0];
}

In Objective-C (and this is valid for C), a method does "exists" only if it has been defined or declared before.

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1  
Rather, a methods signatures is only known in those cases :) –  Georg Fritzsche Jun 22 '10 at 12:37
    
Thankyou! Can't believe it took this long to discover this. –  Mike S Jun 22 '10 at 23:45
    
Just another point.. out of interest why does the order not seem to matter with a int method but only with double? –  Mike S Jun 30 '10 at 5:37
1  
This is because the default return type for an undefined function is "int". –  Laurent Etiemble Jun 30 '10 at 7:05

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