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I've written a web applciation for a client in which authentication/authorization is done by spring security based on the 'internal' database. Now, the client has asked to switch to using their Active Directory instead. I'm a green as can be where LDAP is concerned but looking at the sample code and such it doesn't seem too difficult.

I do have a more general question concerning LDAP. As I gather this is a network protocol for which several implementations are available (among those Active Directory). Now, installing AD on my PC doesn't realy appeal to me (if it is even possible?). However, if all implementations follow the LDAP protocol I would assume that I could simply install Apache Directory on my PC, write the 'code' and then deploy this on a environment with Active Directory and (apart from some config changes) this should work.

Can any one confirm/deny this?

Thanks, Stijn

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up vote 1 down vote accepted

It would be lovely if the LDAP standard was implemented the same on all major platforms, but while true in general, there are sufficient differences that you should plan on working against the target LDAP server instance in development.

For Active Directory you could run a Domain Controller in a VM on your workstation (since you cannot install AD on a workstation). You could install ADAM which is a standalone'ish AD like service. But even that is not a 100% match.

Usually the core issues are related to authentication but the generic functionality for querying with filters and so on are the same cross backend server.

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tx, I'm already dreading it now :-). Seriously, thanks, I'm know now who to turn to... –  Stijn Geukens Jun 24 '10 at 15:04
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