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My question is not about calling a virtual member function from a base class constructor, but whether the pointer to a virtual member function is valid in the base class constructor.

Given the following

class A
{
    void (A::*m_pMember)();

public:
    A() :
        m_pMember(&A::vmember)
    {
    }

    virtual void vmember()
    {
        printf("In A::vmember()\n");
    }

    void test()
    {
        (this->*m_pMember)();
    }
};

class B : public A
{
public:
    virtual void vmember()
    {
        printf("In B::vmember()\n");
    }
};

int main()
{
    B b;
    b.test();

    return 0;
}

Will this produce "In B::vmember()" for all compliant c++ compilers?

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1  
main must return int –  Francesco Jun 22 '10 at 11:54
    
I would guess not. Inside A's constructor, *this is an object of class A yet, and the vtable is A's vtable. Moreover, I would be surprised if &A::vmember resulted in a pointer to B::vmember. But then again, I am not a C++ guru. –  Péter Török Jun 22 '10 at 11:55
1  
Hmmm... might be. Still, my rough understanding is that &A::vmember results not in a pointer to the vtable, but a pointer to a concrete member function. –  Péter Török Jun 22 '10 at 12:01
1  
@Francesco: You can test with every possible compiler on Earth, if this isn't clearly specified in the standard, you'll still be unable to conclude that "it works". –  ereOn Jun 22 '10 at 12:23
1  
@ereOn: It is solidly and clearly defined in the standard. –  AndreyT Jun 22 '10 at 18:25

6 Answers 6

up vote 3 down vote accepted

The pointer is valid, however you have to keep in mind that when a virtual function is invoked through a pointer it is always resolved in accordance with the dynamic type of the object used on the left-hand side. This means that when you invoke a virtual function from the constructor, it doesn't matter whether you invoke it directly or whether you invoke it through a pointer. In both cases the call will resolve to the type whose constructor is currently working. That's how virtual functions work, when you invoke them during object construction (or destruction).

Note also that pointers to member functions are generally not attached to specific functions at the point of initalization. If the target function is non-virtual, they one can say that the pointer points to a specific function. However, if the target function is virtual, there's no way to say where the pointer is pointing to. For example, the language specification explicitly states that when you compare (for equality) two pointers that happen to point to virtual functions, the result is unspecified.

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"Valid" is a specific term when applied to pointers. Data pointers are valid when they point to an object or NULL; function pointers are valid when they point to a function or NULL, and pointers to members are valid when the point to a member or NULL.

However, from your question about actual output, I can infer that you wanted to ask something else. Let's look at your vmember function - or should I say functions? Obviously there are two function bodies. You could have made only the derived one virtual, so that too confirms that there are really two vmember functions, who both happen to be virtual.

Now, the question becomes whether when taking the address of a member function already chooses the actual function. Your implementations show that they don't, and that this only happens when the pointer is actually dereferenced.

The reason it must work this way is trivial. Taking the address of a member function does not involve an actual object, something that would be needed to resolve the virtual call. Let me show you:

namespace {
  void (A::*test)() = &A::vmember;
  A a;
  B b;
  (a.*test)();
  (b.*test)();
}

When we initialize test, there is no object of type A or B at all, yet is it possible to take the address of &A::vmember. That same member pointer can then be used with two different objects. What could this produce but "In A::vmember()\n" and "In B::vmember()\n" ?

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2  
I actually find it baffling that b.A::vmember() and (b.*&A::vmember)() do not produce the same effect... –  Matthieu M. Jun 22 '10 at 17:31
1  
Should be (a.*test)(). Same for b. –  AndreyT Jun 22 '10 at 18:15
    
@AndreyT: fixed. –  MSalters Jun 23 '10 at 8:40
    
The baffling difference is a result of a syntactic similarity between two expressions that semantically aren't that similar. In particular, the first doesn't use a pointer to a virtual member function. Its behavior therefore does not address the question from the title. –  MSalters Jun 23 '10 at 8:54

Read this article for an in-depth discussion of member function pointers and how to use them. This should answer all your questions.

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6  
1  
Besides, it's an old article - for instance, it addresses MSVC4-7. This question is explicitly about compliant compilers. –  MSalters Jun 22 '10 at 13:45
    
That's a lot of text to read when what was requested was a simple yes or no answer. So which is it? –  Rob Kennedy Jun 22 '10 at 16:47
    
It depends very much on your inheritance graph, but generally you will get a valid offset from the start of the object, not full pointer. –  berkus Jun 22 '10 at 23:11
    
Article may be old, but it addresses old compilers for the sake of workarounds. Grab the code and see for yourself. It's amusing if not educational. –  berkus Jun 22 '10 at 23:13

I have found a little explanation on the Old New Thing (a blog by Raymond Chen, sometimes referred to as Microsoft's Chuck Norris).

Of course it says nothing about the compliance, but it explains why:

B b;

b.A::vmember(); // [1]

(b.*&A::vmember)(); // [2]

1 and 2 actually invoke a different function... which is quite surprising, really. It also means that you can't actually prevent the runtime dispatch using a pointer to member function :/

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You probably meant that you can't disable the run-time dispatch when calling a member function through a pointer. –  AndreyT Jun 22 '10 at 18:16
    
I mean that "you can't actually invoke the non-virtual function using a pointer to member function" sounds a bit misleading to me. –  AndreyT Jun 22 '10 at 18:22
    
I corrected it, thanks. –  Matthieu M. Jun 23 '10 at 6:14

I think no. Pointer to virtual member function is resolved via VMT, so the same way as call to this function would happen. It means that it is not valid, since VMT is populated after constructor finished.

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Note that the question explicitly asks only whether the pointer is valid, not calling it within the constructor. The function pointer is invoked after the constructor has finished and the vtable is complete –  anorm Jun 22 '10 at 12:01
2  
but what is a valid pointer that is invalid to call. Either it is valid - then you may call it, or it is invalid and you may not call it. Anyway - why is a pointer needed that is invalid and will not be called? –  Tobias Langner Jun 22 '10 at 12:06
2  
It will be called, just not from the constructor. The m_pMember is called from the test() function in the example –  anorm Jun 22 '10 at 12:08
    
@Andrey: Absolutely incorrect. There are no limitations imposed on virtual function invocation from the constructor, regardless of whether it is done through a pointer or directly. The only thing to remember is that the dynamic type of the object is the type whose constructor is currently working. –  AndreyT Jun 22 '10 at 18:07
    
@AndreyT "virtual function invocation from the constructor" there are, and i will try to find –  Andrey Jun 22 '10 at 18:16

IMO it is implementation defined to take address of a virtual function. This is because virtual functions are implemented using vtables which are compiler implementation specific. Since the vtable is not guaranteed to be complete until the execution of the class ctor is done, a pointer to an entry in such a table (virtual function) may be implementation defined behavior.

There is a somewhat related question that I asked on SO here few months back; which basically says taking address of the virtual function is not specified in the C++ standard.

So, in any case even if it works for you, the solution will not be portable.

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-1, No. Nothing is implementation defined unless the standard explicitly requires implementations to document their behavior. It can't be unspecified behavior either, as there is no range of reasonable behaviors. –  MSalters Jun 22 '10 at 13:40
    
@MSalters: O.K., so would you term taking address of virtual functions undefined behavior? –  Abhay Jun 22 '10 at 14:13
    
@Abhay: Not true. There nothing implementation defined about virtual functions, even when they are invoked through pointers. –  AndreyT Jun 22 '10 at 18:08
    
@AndreyT: Please clarify 'there is nothing implementation defined about virtual functions'. I think the way they are implemented (vtables) itself is implementation defined. –  Abhay Jun 22 '10 at 19:05
    
@Abhay: Details of implementations are always "implementation defined", no argument here :) What I'm saying is that the behavior of virtual functions and pointers to them in C++ language is not implementation defined. As for how this behavior is implemented - it doesn't matter at all. –  AndreyT Jun 22 '10 at 19:08

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