Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I realized that in gvim Control+S as the :update command. I always save using Ctrl+S, so I assume that :update is another way of saying "refresh the changes." Is :update basically the same as write :w? Will I have problems if I replace :update for :w!?

edit: I wanted to change :update to :w! becauase I have a file that says "ready-only please add !." And I thought this was the only solution

share|improve this question
    
You can use bang (!) with update command. –  ZyX Jun 22 '10 at 15:54

4 Answers 4

:help :update is pretty clear on that:

Like ":write", but only write when the buffer has been modified.

So the file will only written if the contents of the buffer have actually been changed. So if you use :update (or press Ctrl+S in GVim) and there are no unsaved changes in the buffer, it won't do anything.

share|improve this answer

From the help:

:[range]up[date][!] [++opt] [>>] [file]
                        Like ":write", but only write when the buffer has been
                        modified.  {not in Vi}
share|improve this answer

Here is another way to explain the difference between :write (shortcut :w) and :update (shortcut :up) :

Whenever we type :w, VIM will literally write the buffer to the file, no matter the buffer is empty or not. That MEANs it will update the timestamp of the file to the time :w typed , even if the contents of the file did NOT actually changed.

While with :up, just like the vim help manual says, the VIM will ONLY update the timestamp when the file has been changed.


For example, when I open a file just for reading, but I may accidentally (or, habitually) type :w or :wq, and if I do care about the timestamps of the file (i.e. last modified time), then there's no turning back. The following examples (in BASH shell) show the effects:

$ touch test.txt
$
$ stat test.txt
      File: `test.txt'
  Size: 0           Blocks: 0          IO Block: 4096   regular empty file
Device: 811h/2065d  Inode: 98828498    Links: 1
Access: (0664/-rw-rw-r--)  Uid: (  514/    rank)   Gid: (  514/    rank)
Access: 2014-03-15 22:30:52.159258193 +0800
Modify: 2014-03-15 22:30:52.159258193 +0800
Change: 2014-03-15 22:30:52.159258193 +0800

Now let's VIM the file and try :up and :w command respectively:

$ vim test.txt

Do not editing, just type :up and then :q

$ stat test.txt
  File: `test.txt'
  Size: 0           Blocks: 0          IO Block: 4096   regular empty file
Device: 811h/2065d  Inode: 98828498    Links: 1
Access: (0664/-rw-rw-r--)  Uid: (  514/    rank)   Gid: (  514/    rank)
Access: 2014-03-15 22:33:10.002269244 +0800  <--- Different!
Modify: 2014-03-15 22:30:52.159258193 +0800  <--- Didn't Change!
Change: 2014-03-15 22:30:52.159258193 +0800  <--- Didn't Change!

As you can see, only the Access time is changed, this is because we read(Access) the data in the file. But the Modify time & Change time are still the same.


Now let's vim again and use the :w command.

$ vim test.txt

Do not editing, BUT this time type :w and then :q

$ stat test.txt
  File: `test.txt'
  Size: 0           Blocks: 0          IO Block: 4096   regular empty file
Device: 811h/2065d  Inode: 98828538    Links: 1
Access: (0664/-rw-rw-r--)  Uid: (  514/    rank)   Gid: (  514/    rank)
Access: 2014-03-15 22:40:26.728239153 +0800  <--- Different Again!
Modify: 2014-03-15 22:40:26.728239153 +0800  <--- Changed!
Change: 2014-03-15 22:40:26.728239153 +0800  <--- Changed!

Now we can see the difference between :up and :w! The data of the file is Modified and the file status also Changed, although there is nothing really changed in the file.


So to avoid this, one can map the :w command to the :up command using :map :w :up.

share|improve this answer

:help :update says:

Like ":write", but only write when the buffer has been modified.

share|improve this answer

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.