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I'm implementing a function called attach. I'm looking for a way to take a param that is either a file path or a file's contents. Here's what I have:

/**
 *  @param name - name of the file
 *  @param file - either a file or a file path
 */
function attach($name, $file) {
    $attachment = array();

    $attachment['name'] = $name;

    if(map($file)) {
        $attachment['filepath'] = $file;
        $attachment['file'] = file_get_contents($file);
    } else {
        $attachment['file'] = $file;
        $attachment['filepath'] = getcwd();
    }
}

/**
 * @param filepath - can take multiple forms
 *   ie. ui:form:text.css => ui/form/text.css
 *       text.css => getcwd().'text.css'
 *       /ui/form/text.css => /ui/form/text.css
 * 
 * @return if file exists - return file path
 *         if not found - return false
*/

function map($filepath) {
   // ... too long to post
}

The map function allows you to turn namespaces (using ":") into filepaths.

The issue I'm worried about is if an error is made in the filepath (ie. someone types in the file path wrong) I don't want it to think that since the file doesn't exist, it must be file contents

Also: if possible, i'd rather not edit map() as it would require me to change a bunch of code - consider map as a black box.

Finally: I put this example together quickly - so please do not discuss the shortcomings of getcwd(), and other syntactical issues. I have a more elaborate system in place in map()

Thanks! Matt Mueller

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2 Answers 2

up vote 2 down vote accepted

Even if PHP had better support for method overloading, you'd have a hard time here since both vars (filepath and file contents) would probably be a string. What is preventing you from just creating a couple of wrapper methods, like attach_filepath(..), attach_filecontents(..)? Or, if you are set on having one method, you could add a third param, like:

function attach($name, $file, $filecontents=false) {

I agree that it would probably be a bad idea to try to guess the users' intentions based on the contents of a var that would have the same type in both cases.

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Yah, unfortunately thats what I figured. I was hoping there was something I was overlooking with file resources or something... I'd rather just not add bulk to the API, but the 3rd parameter is not too bad of an alternative. –  Matt Jun 22 '10 at 13:53
    
Well, you could also require them to pass a file pointer resource instead of a file path string. Then, it's up to them to convert internal namespaces into filepaths (using your helper method) and to initialize them before calling attach(). Then, you could just check for type. –  jmans Jun 22 '10 at 13:57
    
Then again--that could be risky. You probably want to be able to validate the path. –  jmans Jun 22 '10 at 13:58
    
Yah, that seems like much harder than adding a param.. thanks! –  Matt Jun 22 '10 at 14:07

Before adding the attachment your code could use a function like file_exists to determine if what seems like a path actually is a path and the file does in fact exist. Additionally you may want to check if the path refers to a folder or a file.

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The issue I'm worried about is if an error is made in the filepath (ie. someone types in the file path wrong) I don't want it to think that since the file doesn't exist, it must be file contents –  Matt Jun 22 '10 at 13:50

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