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I understand the following Java outputs.

public class EchoTestDrive {
    public static void main(String[] args){
        Echo e1 = new Echo();
        Echo e2 = new Echo();
        int x = 0;
        while (x<4){
            e1.hello();
            e1.count = e1.count + 1;
            if (x==3){
                e2.count = e2.count +1;
            }
            if(x>0){
                e2.count = e2.count + e1.count;
            }
            x = x+1;
            System.out.println("e1.count is " + e1.count);
            System.out.println("e2.count is " + e2.count);
        }
        System.out.println(e2.count);
    }
}

class Echo {
    int count = 0;
    void hello (){
        System.out.println ("helloooooooo..");
    }
}

Outputs

helloooooooo..
e1.count is 1
e2.count is 0
helloooooooo..
e1.count is 2
e2.count is 2
helloooooooo..
e1.count is 3
e2.count is 5
helloooooooo..
e1.count is 4
e2.count is 10
10

However when I change Echo e2 = new Echo () to Echo e2 = e1, I don't understand why the outputs is so.

public class EchoTestDrive {
    public static void main(String[] args){
        Echo e1 = new Echo();
        Echo e2 = e1;
        int x = 0;
        while (x<4){
            e1.hello();
            e1.count = e1.count + 1;
            if (x==3){
                e2.count = e2.count +1;
            }
            if(x>0){
                e2.count = e2.count + e1.count;
            }
            x = x+1;
            System.out.println("e1.count is " + e1.count);
            System.out.println("e2.count is " + e2.count);
        }
        System.out.println(e2.count);
    }
}

class Echo {
    int count = 0;
    void hello (){
        System.out.println ("helloooooooo..");
    }
}

Output

helloooooooo..
e1.count is 1
e2.count is 1
helloooooooo..
e1.count is 4
e2.count is 4
helloooooooo..
e1.count is 10
e2.count is 10
helloooooooo..
e1.count is 24
e2.count is 24
24

To me when x = 0, e1.count is 1 and e2.count is 0. When x = 1, e1.count is e1.count is 2 and e2.count is 2. etc.

I am hoping someone explains it.

Thanks in advance.

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6 Answers 6

up vote 5 down vote accepted

When you have Echo e2=e1; you make it so both e1 and e2 point to the same memory location. Thus whenever you add to e2 it adds to that memory location so e1 has the same value and vis versa. Specifically

When x = 0

e1.hello();
        e1.count = e1.count + 1;   //adds 1 to the memory location
        if (x==3){  // x is 0 so doesn't go in
            e2.count = e2.count +1;
        }
        if(x>0){  // x is 0 so doesn't go in
            e2.count = e2.count + e1.count;
        }
        x = x+1;
        System.out.println("e1.count is " + e1.count);
        System.out.println("e2.count is " + e2.count);
    }
    System.out.println(e2.count);
}

Thus the memory location equals 1 and both e1 and e2 are 1

When x = 1

e1.hello();
        e1.count = e1.count + 1;   
           //adds 1 to the memory location which was already 1 from last time and now equals 2
        if (x==3){  // x is 1 so doesn't go in
            e2.count = e2.count +1;
        }
        if(x>0){  // x is 1 so goes in as 1 is greater than 0
            e2.count = e2.count + e1.count;  // adds e2 and e1 = 2 + 2 from previous line above = 4
        }
        x = x+1;
        System.out.println("e1.count is " + e1.count);
        System.out.println("e2.count is " + e2.count);
    }
    System.out.println(e2.count);
}

Thus the memory location equals 4 and both e1 and e2 are 4

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in Java variables that hold objects are really references, they do not hold the actual value. so when you write e2 = e1 you set reference e2 to point to the same object that e1 does. so when you write e2.count = 1, the e1.count is set to same value, because they are fields of same object.

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After you did Echo e2 = e1; e1 and e2 are the same object. You just have two handles to access it, but it's the same thing and all the contents is the same. Basically, you have as many objects as many new statements you've executed

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Java assignments are all by reference. Thus, when you say

Echo e2 = e1;

You are saying Make another reference labeled e2 and point it to the same data as the reference labeled e1. Then, when the data pointed to by e1 changes, so does the data pointed to by e2, because it is the same data.

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Echo e2 = e1 makes e2 refer to the same object as e1. So from then on, you have one single object behind 2 distinct references.

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When you set e1 = e2 you are saying that the references e1 and e2 point to the same Echo object. So then you should treat e1.count and e2.count to be the same value. So it goes 0 -> 1 -> 2 -> 4 -> 5 -> 10.. etc.

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