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If you have java.io.InputStream object, how should you process that object and produce a String?


Suppose I have an InputStream that contains text data, and I want to convert this to a String (for example, so I can write the contents of the stream to a log file).

What is the easiest way to take the InputStream and convert it to a String?

public String convertStreamToString(InputStream is) { 
    // ???
}
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363  
Boy, I'm absolutely in love with Java, but this question comes up so often you'd think they'd just figure out that the chaining of streams is somewhat difficult and either make helpers to create various combinations or rethink the whole thing. –  Bill K Nov 21 '08 at 17:16
8  
You are right. I tend to use a set of helper classes that do it once for me, so I don't need keep referring to Google or even StackOverflow for the answer. In this case, I was away from my utility code and couldn't remember exactly how to do it. What better way to open my account on the site. –  Johnny Maelstrom Nov 26 '08 at 11:21
20  
Yeah, it really shouldn't require so much boilerplate to do something as simple as read strings from a stream. It's not that difficult, just annoying. –  Adam Jaskiewicz Dec 8 '08 at 20:19
5  
@Adam: It really depends on what kind of Stream you're working with. For instance, System.console().readLine() (new in Java 6) is pretty easy. Same with BufferedReader's readLine(). The only hard part is when you don't know how many characters you need to read. –  Powerlord Dec 8 '08 at 20:46
5  
The answers to this question only work if you want to read the stream's contents fully (until it is closed). Since that is not always intended (http requests with a keep-alive connection won't be closed), these method calls block (not giving you the contents). –  f1sh Jul 14 '10 at 13:32
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28 Answers

up vote 605 down vote accepted

A nice way to do this is using Apache commons IOUtils to copy the InputStream into a StringWriter... something like

StringWriter writer = new StringWriter();
IOUtils.copy(inputStream, writer, encoding);
String theString = writer.toString();

Alternatively, you could use ByteArrayOutputStream if you don't want to mix your Streams and Writers

share|improve this answer
30  
I hope IOUtils takes an optional Charset (or at least the name of the encodding to use). Best not to leave this kind of thing to chance :) –  Jon Skeet Nov 21 '08 at 17:10
4  
Haha - of course it does! commons.apache.org/io/apidocs/org/apache/commons/io/… –  Harry Lime Nov 21 '08 at 17:11
1  
Why copy the inputstream to a writer? Why not just use a reader? Or read all bytes and use new String(bytes, charset)? –  Bart van Heukelom Oct 11 '10 at 22:27
78  
You really, really, really should be using IOUtils.copy(inputStream, writer, encoding); unless you really, really, really know what you're doing, which people never do with character encoding related programming. Or in this case, IOUtils.toString(inputStream, encoding). Methods that use the platform default encoding are almost never correct to use, like every other method that gives different results depending on which machine/operating system/platform or version thereof it is run on. –  Christoffer Hammarström Dec 17 '10 at 13:45
24  
I think the below answer (IOUtils.toString()) is simpler since there is no need for a StringWriter –  Patrick Feb 1 '11 at 23:55
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Here's a way using only standard Java library (note that the stream is not closed, YMMV).

static String convertStreamToString(java.io.InputStream is) {
    java.util.Scanner s = new java.util.Scanner(is).useDelimiter("\\A");
    return s.hasNext() ? s.next() : "";
}

I learned this trick from "Stupid Scanner tricks" article. The reason it works is because Scanner iterates over tokens in the stream, and in this case we separate tokens using "beginning of the input boundary" (\A) thus giving us only one token for the entire contents of the stream.

Note, if you need to be specific about the input stream's encoding, you can provide the second argument to Scanner constructor that indicates what charset to use (e.g. "UTF-8").

Hat tip goes also to Jacob, who once pointed me to the said article.

EDITED: Thanks to a suggestion from Patrick, made the function more robust when handling an empty input stream. One more edit: nixed try/catch, Patrick's way is more laconic.

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2  
Thanks, for my version of this I added a finally block that closes the input stream, so the user doesn't have to since you've finished reading the input. Simplifies the caller code considerably. –  dalewking Apr 21 '12 at 17:07
1  
I think this should be public *static* String convertStreamToString –  Shurane Jun 1 '12 at 21:14
1  
@PavelRepin @Patrick in my case, an empty inputStream caused a NPE during Scanner construction. I had to add if (is == null) return ""; right at the beginning of the method; I believe this answer needs to be updated to better handle null inputStreams. –  CFL_Jeff Aug 9 '12 at 13:36
18  
For Java 7 you can close in a try-with: try(java.util.Scanner s = new java.util.Scanner(is)) { return s.useDelimiter("\\A").hasNext() ? s.next() : ""; } –  earcam Jun 13 '13 at 5:24
1  
FYI, hasNext blocks on console input streams (see here). (Just ran into this issue right now.) This solution works fine otherwise... just a heads up. –  Ryan Feb 24 at 5:36
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Apache Commons allows:

String myString = IOUtils.toString(myInputStream, "UTF-8");

Of course, you could choose other character encodings besides UTF-8.

Also see: (Docs)

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8  
IOUtils.toString is deprecated –  landon9720 Jan 7 '10 at 0:15
62  
No it isn't. Only the version that takes a byte[] parameter is. –  Sean Patrick Floyd Nov 16 '10 at 9:04
5  
@Guillaume Coté I guess the message here is that you never should be "fine with the default encoding", since you cannot be sure of what it is, depending on the platform the java code is run on. –  Per Wiklander Feb 3 '11 at 21:54
2  
@Per Wiklander I disagree with you. Code that is going to work on a single could be quite sure that default encoding will be fine. For code that only open local file, it is a reasonable option to ask them to be encoded in the platform default encoding. –  Guillaume Coté Feb 4 '11 at 15:56
6  
To save anyone the hassle of Googling - <dependency> <groupId>org.apache.commons</groupId> <artifactId>commons-io</artifactId> <version>1.3.2</version> </dependency> –  Chris Mar 9 '12 at 12:04
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Taking into account file one should first get a java.io.Reader instance. This can then be read and added to a StringBuilder (we don't need StringBuffer if we are not accessing it in multiple threads, and StringBuilder is faster). The trick here is that we work in blocks, and as such don't need other buffering streams. The block size is parameterized for run-time performance optimization.

public static String slurp(final InputStream is, final int bufferSize)
{
  final char[] buffer = new char[bufferSize];
  final StringBuilder out = new StringBuilder();
  try {
    final Reader in = new InputStreamReader(is, "UTF-8");
    try {
      for (;;) {
        int rsz = in.read(buffer, 0, buffer.length);
        if (rsz < 0)
          break;
        out.append(buffer, 0, rsz);
      }
    }
    finally {
      in.close();
    }
  }
  catch (UnsupportedEncodingException ex) {
    /* ... */
  }
  catch (IOException ex) {
      /* ... */
  }
  return out.toString();
}
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41  
I like how this works without adding more libraries to your project. –  User1 Jan 12 '11 at 23:36
4  
This solution uses multibyte characters. The example uses the UTF-8 encoding that allows expression of the full unicode range (Including Chinese). Replacing "UTF-8" with another encoding would allow that encoding to be used. –  Paul de Vrieze Dec 9 '11 at 23:11
8  
@User1 - I like using libraries in my code so I can get my job done faster. It's awesome when your managers say "Wow James! How did you get that done so fast?!". But when we have to spend time reinventing the wheel just because we have misplaced ideas about including a common, reusable, tried and tested utility, we're giving up time we could be spending furthering our project's goals. When we reinvent the wheel, we work twice as hard yet get to the finish line much later. Once we're at the finish line, there is no one there to congratulate us. When building a house, don't build the hammer too –  jmort253 Jan 20 '12 at 1:05
3  
Sorry, after re-reading my comment, it comes off a little arrogant. I just think it's important to have a good reason to avoid libraries and that the reason is a valid one, which there very well could be :) –  jmort253 Jan 20 '12 at 1:35
4  
@jmort253 If you would already use apache commons I would say, go for it. At the same time, there is a real cost to using libraries (as the dependency proliferation in many apache java libraries shows). If this would be the only use of the library, it would be overkill to use the library. On the other hand, determining your own buffer size(s) you can tune your memory/processor usage balance. –  Paul de Vrieze May 22 '12 at 9:16
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How about this?

InputStream in = /* your InputStream */;
InputStreamReader is = new InputStreamReader(in);
StringBuilder sb=new StringBuilder();
BufferedReader br = new BufferedReader(is);
String read = br.readLine();

while(read != null) {
    //System.out.println(read);
    sb.append(read);
    read =br.readLine();

}

return sb.toString();
share|improve this answer
2  
Doesn't answer the question. This shows how to iterate over the lines in a stream, not how to read the entire stream into a string. –  Andrew Mar 23 '12 at 15:11
6  
you can concat all string in to one String.that is simple..... –  sampathpremarathna Mar 25 '12 at 14:34
3  
The thing is, you're first splitting into lines, and then undoing that. It's easier and faster to just read arbitrary buffers. –  Paul de Vrieze Apr 20 '12 at 18:36
2  
Also, readLine does not distinguish between \n and \r, so you cannot reproduce the exact stream again. –  Délawen Sep 10 '12 at 8:08
    
@PauldeVrieze how many lines, and how quickly do you need to process them!? I would hazard a guess that any performance loss would be small, or could be handled by every once in a while logging them to a file and destroying the old String obj's. –  Thufir Aug 28 '13 at 6:52
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If you are using Google-Collections/Guava you could do the following:

InputStream stream = ...
String content = CharStreams.toString(new InputStreamReader(stream, Charsets.UTF_8));
Closeables.closeQuietly(stream);

Note that the second parameter (i.e. Charsets.UTF_8) for the InputStreamReader isn't necessary, but it is generally a good idea to specify the encoding if you know it (which you should!)

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2  
@harschware: Given the question was: "If you have java.io.InputStream object how should you process that object and produce a String?" I assumed that a stream is already present in the situation. –  Sakuraba Apr 13 '11 at 9:41
    
You didn't explain your answer very well, and had extraneous variables; user359996 said the same thing as you, but much more clearly. –  Uronym Sep 1 '11 at 22:10
    
it returns to me boxes instead of actual text characters. plz advise –  Vik Nov 12 '11 at 13:20
1  
+1 for guava, -1 for not specifying the encoding of the input stream. eg. new InputStreamReader(stream, "UTF-8") –  andras Jul 6 '12 at 11:01
1  
@plasma147 Instead of downvoting, consider editing the example (I just submitted that, adding Closeables.closeQuietly(stream);) –  ralfoide Jan 30 '13 at 16:30
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public String readFully(InputStream inputStream, String encoding)
        throws IOException {
    return new String(readFully(inputStream), encoding);
}    

private byte[] readFully(InputStream inputStream)
        throws IOException {
    ByteArrayOutputStream baos = new ByteArrayOutputStream();
    byte[] buffer = new byte[1024];
    int length = 0;
    while ((length = inputStream.read(buffer)) != -1) {
        baos.write(buffer, 0, length);
    }
    return baos.toByteArray();
}
share|improve this answer
1  
Works well on Android in comparison with other answers which work only in enterprise java. –  vorrtex Jan 14 '13 at 19:30
1  
That's where it came from... My Android tools library :) –  TacB0sS Jan 20 '13 at 23:14
    
Crashed in Android with OutOfMemory error on the ".write" line, every time, for short strings. –  Adam Apr 15 '13 at 17:18
    
What on earth do you copy...??? I copy 5 - 10 mb files easy... –  TacB0sS May 21 '13 at 23:01
3  
Please specify the encoding - it's a very common bug –  Mr_and_Mrs_D Jul 27 '13 at 16:07
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Here's the most elegant, pure-Java (no library) solution I came up with after some experimentation:

public static String fromStream(InputStream in) throws IOException
{
    BufferedReader reader = new BufferedReader(new InputStreamReader(in));
    StringBuilder out = new StringBuilder();
    String newLine = System.getProperty("line.separator");
    String line;
    while ((line = reader.readLine()) != null) {
        out.append(line);
        out.append(newLine);
    }
    return out.toString();
}
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1  
Isn't there a reader.close() missing? Ideally with try/finally... –  Torben Kohlmeier Jun 2 '13 at 13:50
3  
@TorbenKohlmeier, readers and buffers don't need to be closed. The provided InputStream should be closed by the caller. –  Drew Noakes Jun 3 '13 at 11:37
3  
Don't forget to mention that there's a more preferable constructor in InputStreamReader that takes a CharSet. –  jontejj Jun 27 '13 at 12:36
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How about:

import java.io.BufferedInputStream;
import java.io.ByteArrayOutputStream;
import java.io.InputStream;
import java.io.IOException;    

public static String readInputStreamAsString(InputStream in) 
    throws IOException {

    BufferedInputStream bis = new BufferedInputStream(in);
    ByteArrayOutputStream buf = new ByteArrayOutputStream();
    int result = bis.read();
    while(result != -1) {
      byte b = (byte)result;
      buf.write(b);
      result = bis.read();
    }        
    return buf.toString();
}
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As an alternative to the Commons libraries, Google's excellent guava-libraries let you do this fairly concisely; given an InputStream named inputStream:

import com.google.common.io.CharStreams;

CharStreams.toString( new InputStreamReader( inputStream ));
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2  
Note this method is particularly convenient if, instead of an InputStream, you have a Reader. For example, if you're getting the body of an HTTP request via HttpServletRequest.getReader(), it's just CharStreams.toString( request.getReader() ). –  user359996 Mar 24 '11 at 17:36
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Here's more-or-less sampath's answer, cleaned up a bit and represented as a function:

String streamToString(InputStream in) throws IOException {
  StringBuilder out = new StringBuilder();
  BufferedReader br = new BufferedReader(new InputStreamReader(in));
  for(String line = br.readLine(); line != null; line = br.readLine()) 
    out.append(line);
  br.close();
  return out.toString();
}
share|improve this answer
    
again no encoding –  Mr_and_Mrs_D Jul 27 '13 at 16:09
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If you can't use Commons IO (FileUtils/IOUtils/CopyUtils) here's an example using a BufferedReader to read the file line by line:

public class StringFromFile {
    public static void main(String[] args) /*throws UnsupportedEncodingException*/ {
        InputStream is = StringFromFile.class.getResourceAsStream("file.txt");
        BufferedReader br = new BufferedReader(new InputStreamReader(is/*, "UTF-8"*/));
        final int CHARS_PER_PAGE = 5000; //counting spaces
        StringBuilder builder = new StringBuilder(CHARS_PER_PAGE);
        try {
            for(String line=br.readLine(); line!=null; line=br.readLine()) {
                builder.append(line);
                builder.append('\n');
            }
        } catch (IOException ignore) { }
        String text = builder.toString();
        System.out.println(text);
    }
}

or if you want raw speed I'd propose a variation on what Paul de Vrieze suggested (which avoids using a StringWriter (which uses a StringBuffer internally) :

public class StringFromFileFast {
    public static void main(String[] args) /*throws UnsupportedEncodingException*/ {
        InputStream is = StringFromFileFast.class.getResourceAsStream("file.txt");
        InputStreamReader input = new InputStreamReader(is/*, "UTF-8"*/);
        final int CHARS_PER_PAGE = 5000; //counting spaces
        final char[] buffer = new char[CHARS_PER_PAGE];
        StringBuilder output = new StringBuilder(CHARS_PER_PAGE);
        try {
            for(int read = input.read(buffer, 0, buffer.length);
                    read != -1;
                    read = input.read(buffer, 0, buffer.length)) {
                output.append(buffer, 0, read);
            }
        } catch (IOException ignore) { }

        String text = output.toString();
        System.out.println(text);
    }
}
share|improve this answer
    
In order to make your code work, I had to use this.getClass().getClassLoader().getResourceAsStream() (using Eclipse with a maven project) –  greuze Jan 24 '12 at 12:27
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If you were feeling adventurous, you could mix Scala and Java and end up with this:

scala.io.Source.fromInputStream(is).mkString("")

Mixing Java and Scala code and libraries has it's benefits.

See full description here: Idiomatic way to convert an InputStream to a String in Scala

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I ran some timing tests because time matters, always.

I attempted to get the response into a String 3 different ways. (shown below)
I left out try/catch blocks for the sake readability.

To give context, this is the preceding code for all 3 approaches:

   String response;
   String url = "www.blah.com/path?key=value";
   GetMethod method = new GetMethod(url);
   int status = client.executeMethod(method);

1)

 response = method.getResponseBodyAsString();

2)

InputStream resp = method.getResponseBodyAsStream();
InputStreamReader is=new InputStreamReader(resp);
BufferedReader br=new BufferedReader(is);
String read = null;
StringBuffer sb = new StringBuffer(read);
while((read = br.readLine()) != null) {
    sb.append(read);
}
response = sb.toString();

3)

InputStream iStream  = method.getResponseBodyAsStream();
StringWriter writer = new StringWriter();
IOUtils.copy(iStream, writer, "UTF-8");
response = writer.toString();

So, after running 500 tests on each approach with the same request/response data, here are the numbers. Once again, these are my findings and your findings may not be exactly the same, but I wrote this to give some indication to others of the efficiency differences of these approaches.

Ranks:
Approach #1
Approach #3 - 2.6% slower than #1
Approach #2 - 4.3% slower than #1

Any of these approaches is an appropriate solution for grabbing a response and creating a String from it.

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1  
2) contains an error, it adds always "null" at the end of the string as you are always makeing one more step then necessary. Performance will be the same anyway I think. This should work: String read = null; StringBuffer sb = new StringBuffer(); while((read = br.readLine()) != null) { sb.append(read); } –  LukeSolar Oct 21 '11 at 13:32
add comment
import java.io.ByteArrayOutputStream;
import java.io.InputStream;

...

InputStream is = ....
ByteArrayOutputStream baos = new ByteArrayOutputStream(8192);
byte[] buffer = new byte[8192];
int count = 0;
try {
  while ((count = is.read(buffer)) != -1) {
    baos.write(buffer, 0, count);
  }
}
finally {
  try {
    is.close();
  }
  catch (Exception ignore) {
  }
}

String charset = "UTF-8";
String inputStreamAsString = baos.toString(charset);
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1  
Please give a description on what you are trying to accomplish. –  Ragunath Jawahar Nov 2 '12 at 12:58
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make sure to close the streams at end if you use Stream Readers

    private String readStream(InputStream iStream) throws IOException {
        //build a Stream Reader, it can read char by char
        InputStreamReader iStreamReader = new InputStreamReader(iStream);
        //build a buffered Reader, so that i can read whole line at once
        BufferedReader bReader = new BufferedReader(iStreamReader);
        String line = null;
        StringBuilder builder = new StringBuilder();
        while((line = bReader.readLine()) != null) {  //Read till end
            builder.append(line);
        }
        bReader.close();         //close all opened stuff
        iStreamReader.close();
        iStream.close();
        return builder.toString();
    }
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InputStreamReader i=new InputStreamReader(s);
BufferedReader str=new BufferedReader(i);
String msg=str.readLine();
System.out.println(msg);

here s is your InputStream object which will get convert into String :)

share|improve this answer
    
will it work if last 2 lines are inserted in do-while loop? –  KNU Apr 7 at 11:34
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Well you can program it for yourself.. it's not complicated..

String Inputstream2String (InputStream is) throws IOException 
    {
        final int PKG_SIZE = 1024;
        byte[] data = new byte [PKG_SIZE];
        StringBuilder buffer = new StringBuilder(PKG_SIZE * 10);
        int size;

        size = is.read(data, 0, data.length);
        while (size > 0)
        {
            String str = new String(data, 0, size);
            buffer.append(str);
            size = is.read(data, 0, data.length);
        }
        return buffer.toString();
    }
share|improve this answer
1  
Since you're using buffer variable locally with no chance of being shared across multiple threads you should consider changing its type to StringBuilder, to avoid the overhead of (useless) synchronization. –  Alex Nov 8 '13 at 10:27
    
That's a good point alex!. I thing that we both agree that this method isn't thread-safe in many ways. Even the input stream operations aren't thread-safe. –  Victor Nov 8 '13 at 16:19
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The below code worked for me.

    URL url = MyClass.class.getResource("/" + configFileName);
    BufferedInputStream bi = (BufferedInputStream) url.getContent();
    byte[] buffer = new byte[bi.available() ];
    int bytesRead = bi.read(buffer);
    String out = new String(buffer);

Please note, according to Java docs, the available() method might not work with InputStream but always works with BufferedInputStream. In case you don't want to use available() method we can always use the below code

    URL url = MyClass.class.getResource("/" + configFileName);
    BufferedInputStream bi = (BufferedInputStream) url.getContent();
    File f = new File(url.getPath());
    byte[] buffer = new byte[ (int) f.length()];
    int bytesRead = bi.read(buffer);
    String out = new String(buffer);

I am not sure if there will be any encoding issues. Please comment, if there will be any issues with the code

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2  
The whole point of using InputStream is, that a) you don't know the length of the complete stream (which bails out anything depending on available) and b) the stream can be anything - a file, a socket, something internal (which bails out anything based on File.size()). Regarding available: This will cut off data if the stream is longer than the buffer size. –  A.H. Jul 24 '12 at 10:26
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I have written a class that does just that, so I figured I'd share it with everyone. Sometimes you don't want to add Apache Commons just for one thing, and want something dumber than Scanner that doesn't examine the content.

Usage is as follows

// Read from InputStream
String data = new ReaderSink(inputStream, Charset.forName("UTF-8")).drain();

// Read from File
data = new ReaderSink(file, Charset.forName("UTF-8")).drain();

// Drain input stream to console
new ReaderSink(inputStream, Charset.forName("UTF-8")).drainTo(System.out);

Here is the code for ReaderSink:

import java.io.*;
import java.nio.charset.Charset;

/**
 * A simple sink class that drains a {@link Reader} to a {@link String} or
 * to a {@link Writer}.
 *
 * @author Ben Barkay
 * @version 2/20/2014
 */
public class ReaderSink {
    /**
     * The default buffer size to use if no buffer size was specified.
     */
    public static final int DEFAULT_BUFFER_SIZE = 1024;

    /**
     * The {@link Reader} that will be drained.
     */
    private final Reader in;

    /**
     * Constructs a new {@code ReaderSink} for the specified file and charset.
     * @param file      The file to read from.
     * @param charset   The charset to use.
     * @throws FileNotFoundException    If the file was not found on the filesystem.
     */
    public ReaderSink(File file, Charset charset) throws FileNotFoundException {
        this(new FileInputStream(file), charset);
    }

    /**
     * Constructs a new {@code ReaderSink} for the specified {@link InputStream}.
     * @param in        The {@link InputStream} to drain.
     * @param charset   The charset to use.
     */
    public ReaderSink(InputStream in, Charset charset) {
        this(new InputStreamReader(in, charset));
    }

    /**
     * Constructs a new {@code ReaderSink} for the specified {@link Reader}.
     * @param in    The reader to drain.
     */
    public ReaderSink(Reader in) {
        this.in = in;
    }

    /**
     * Drains the data from the underlying {@link Reader}, returning a {@link String} containing
     * all of the read information. This method will use {@link #DEFAULT_BUFFER_SIZE} for
     * its buffer size.
     * @return  A {@link String} containing all of the information that was read.
     */
    public String drain() throws IOException {
        return drain(DEFAULT_BUFFER_SIZE);
    }

    /**
     * Drains the data from the underlying {@link Reader}, returning a {@link String} containing
     * all of the read information.
     * @param bufferSize    The size of the buffer to use when reading.
     * @return  A {@link String} containing all of the information that was read.
     */
    public String drain(int bufferSize) throws IOException {
        StringWriter stringWriter = new StringWriter();
        drainTo(stringWriter, bufferSize);
        return stringWriter.toString();
    }

    /**
     * Drains the data from the underlying {@link Reader}, writing it to the
     * specified {@link Writer}. This method will use {@link #DEFAULT_BUFFER_SIZE} for
     * its buffer size.
     * @param out   The {@link Writer} to write to.
     */
    public void drainTo(Writer out) throws IOException {
        drainTo(out, DEFAULT_BUFFER_SIZE);
    }

    /**
     * Drains the data from the underlying {@link Reader}, writing it to the
     * specified {@link Writer}.
     * @param out           The {@link Writer} to write to.
     * @param bufferSize    The size of the buffer to use when reader.
     */
    public void drainTo(Writer out, int bufferSize) throws IOException {
        char[] buffer = new char[bufferSize];
        int read;
        while ((read = in.read(buffer)) > -1) {
            out.write(buffer, 0, read);
        }
    }
}
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JDK 7/8 answer that closes the stream and still throws an IOException:

StringBuilder build = new StringBuilder();
byte[] buf = new byte[1024];
int length;
try (InputStream is = getInputStream()) {
  while ((length = is.read(buf)) != -1) {
    build.append(new String(buf, 0, length));
  }
}
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You can use apache commons. In the IOUtils you can find the toString metod with 3 helpfull implementations.

public static String toString(InputStream input) throws IOException {
        return toString(input, Charset.defaultCharset());
}

public static String toString(InputStream input) throws IOException {
        return toString(input, Charset.defaultCharset());
}

public static String toString(InputStream input, String encoding)
            throws IOException {
        return toString(input, Charsets.toCharset(encoding));
}
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This snippet was found in \sdk\samples\android-19\connectivity\NetworkConnect\NetworkConnectSample\src\main\java\com\example\android\networkconnect\MainActivity.java which is licensed under Apache License, Version 2.0 and written by Google.

/** Reads an InputStream and converts it to a String.
 * @param stream InputStream containing HTML from targeted site.
 * @param len Length of string that this method returns.
 * @return String concatenated according to len parameter.
 * @throws java.io.IOException
 * @throws java.io.UnsupportedEncodingException
 */
private String readIt(InputStream stream, int len) throws IOException, UnsupportedEncodingException {
    Reader reader = null;
    reader = new InputStreamReader(stream, "UTF-8");
    char[] buffer = new char[len];
    reader.read(buffer);
    return new String(buffer);
}
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Try these 4 statements..

As per the point recalled by Fred, it is not recommended to append a String with += operator since every time a new char is appended to the existing String creating a new String object again and assigning its address to st while the old st object becomes garbage.

public String convertStreamToString(InputStream is)
{
int k;
     StringBuffer sb=new StringBuffer();
     while((k=fin.read())!=-1)
     {
     sb.append((char)k);
     }
return sb.toString();
}

Not recommended, but this is also a way

public String convertStreamToString(InputStream is) { 
    int k;
    String st="";
    while((k=is.read())!=-1)
    {
    st+=(char)k;
    }
return st;
}
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String concatenation in a loop with the += operator is not a good idea. It is better to use a StringBuilder or a StringBuffer. –  Fred Feb 20 at 15:24
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public static String getString( InputStream is) throws IOException {
    int ch;
    StringBuilder sb = new StringBuilder();
    while((ch = is.read())!= -1)
        sb.append((char)ch);
    return sb.toString();
}
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First ,you have to know the encoding of string that you want to convert.Because the java.io.InputStream operates an underlying array of bytes,however,a string is composed by a array of character that needs an encoding, e,g. UTF-8,the JDK will take the default encoding that is taken from System.getProperty("file.encoding","UTF-8");

byte[] bytes=new byte[inputStream.available()];
inputStream.read(bytes);
String s = new String(bytes);

If inputStream's byte array is very big, you could do it in loop.

:EOF

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6  
From the javadocs: Note that while some implementations of InputStream will return the total number of bytes in the stream, many will not. It is never correct to use the return value of this method to allocate a buffer intended to hold all data in this stream. –  tylermac Oct 6 '11 at 16:09
    
This is a bad idea! Don't be burnt by misunderstanding what available() gives you. –  Drew Noakes Jan 1 '13 at 3:42
    
As mentioned above, available() is not the way to go. It's highly recommended to ignore this method so much so that you could treat this to be a restricted API. –  asgs Aug 7 '13 at 3:10
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  InputStream IS=new URL("http://www.petrol.si/api/gas_prices.json").openStream();   

  ByteArrayOutputStream BAOS=new ByteArrayOutputStream();
  IOUtils.copy(IS, BAOS);
  String d= new String(BAOS.toByteArray(),"UTF-8");           

System.out.println(d);
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See the commet by ChristofferHammarström in the answer by HarryLime. –  Martin Schröder May 15 '13 at 15:23
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Quick and easy:

String result = (String)new ObjectInputStream( inputStream ).readObject();
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I get java.io.StreamCorruptedException: invalid stream header –  XXL Jul 20 '12 at 11:13
2  
ObjectInputStream is about deserialization, and the stream have to respect the serialization protocol to work, which may not always true in the context of this question. –  Brice Apr 3 '13 at 14:17
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protected by NullPoiиteя Jun 10 '13 at 5:09

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