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I have PHP code that execute a stored procedure 10 times. If one stored procedure call fails, it should continue on, and at the end commit the transaction.

It basically looks like this:

$connection = getConn();

foreach($row as $i=>$j) {
  $SQL = "BEGIN MYPROC.EXECUTE(:VAL1, :VAL2); END;";
  $statement = OCIParse($connection, $SQL);

  oci_bind_by_name($statement, 'VAL1', $row[i]['FIRSTVAL']);
  oci_bind_by_name($statement, 'VAL2', $row[i]['SECONDVAL']);

  $success = @OCIExecute($statement, OCI_DEFAULT);
  if(!$success) {
    print 'Exception in stored proc call';
  }
  else {
    print 'Success';
  }

}
oci_commit($connection);

My question is, if there is an exception raised in, say, the 5th stored proc call, will that roll back all the stored proc calls up to that point?

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Good question. What behaviour are you getting now when the 5th stored proc call fails? –  FrustratedWithFormsDesigner Jun 22 '10 at 16:04
    
It's not rolling back anything. The successful executions are all being committed. That's why I'm confused, because in 1.10.4 of this site ( soft.buaa.edu.cn/oracle/bookshelf/Oreilly/langpkt/ch01_10.htm ) it indicates that unhandled exceptions would be rolled back when control returned to the calling application. –  aw crud Jun 22 '10 at 16:07
    
This page says differently: stanford.edu/dept/itss/docs/oracle/10g/appdev.101/b10807/… Under the "Catching Unhandled Exceptions" section it states, "Unhandled exceptions can also affect subprograms. If you exit a subprogram successfully, PL/SQL assigns values to OUT parameters. However, if you exit with an unhandled exception, PL/SQL does not assign values to OUT parameters (unless they are NOCOPY parameters). Also, if a stored subprogram fails with an unhandled exception, PL/SQL does not roll back database work done by the subprogram." –  aw crud Jun 22 '10 at 16:24
    
I'm not sure how PHP and inline PLSQL are treated, and if they are considered "subprograms" of the nature in the comment above, or if they are treated as top level programs, in which case I (assume) it would roll back? –  aw crud Jun 22 '10 at 16:25
    
Oracle rolls nothing back "for you", unhandled exception or not. Test this yourself: perform an update on a table. perform a second update where some value = 1/0, throwing an exception. Now reselect the row from your original update - it's still changed. YOU are responsible for committing and rolling back your changes. –  DCookie Jun 22 '10 at 17:24

3 Answers 3

up vote 1 down vote accepted

As long as each procedure is executed in the same session, and none of them issue a commit, then the changes they make can be rolled back. You should open the connection outside the loop, then do all your work within that. As it stands now, you're connecting each time through the loop, which is inefficient and won't allow what you want to do. You should also take the commit statement outside the loop.

Something like this, perhaps:

$SQL = "BEGIN MYPROC.EXECUTE(:VAL1, :VAL2); END;";
$connection = getConn();
$statement = OCIParse($connection, $SQL);

foreach($row as $i=>$j) {

  oci_bind_by_name($statement, 'VAL1', $row[i]['FIRSTVAL']);
  oci_bind_by_name($statement, 'VAL2', $row[i]['SECONDVAL']);

  $success = @OCIExecute($statement, OCI_DEFAULT);
  if(!$success) {
    print 'Exception in stored proc call';
    oci_rollback($connection);
    exit processing here... 
  }
  else {
    print 'Success';
  }
}
oci_commit($connection);
share|improve this answer
    
Apologies for not being more explicit... the getConn() function returns a singleton connection, so it's all the same connection. Your answer is what I expect, but for some reason all the successful executions are being committed even though the 5th of 10 executions is failing with an unhandled exception. –  aw crud Jun 22 '10 at 16:17
    
I edited the code slightly, with the same end result, to be more clear. –  aw crud Jun 22 '10 at 16:47
    
Are you rolling back your transaction when the 5th fails? Your commit in the original code is inside your loop, which means each time through the loop your changes are made permanent. You need to put the commit outside the loop, and don't do it at all if you encounter an exception. –  DCookie Jun 22 '10 at 16:59
    
Also, you don't need to reparse the statement each time through the loop. Simply re-binding the parameter values is sufficient. –  DCookie Jun 22 '10 at 17:00
    
Your example does not abort processing in the case of an error though. Just because the 5th procedure generates an Oracle exception does not mean all prior updates are rolled back. If you continue processing after the exception, and do a commit, then the successful updates are still in effect and your commit saves them for posterity. –  DCookie Jun 22 '10 at 17:09

I think the PHP driver, and not Oracle, is controlling the commit here. This seems to indicate that as of PHP 5.3.2 (PECL OCI8 1.4), each invocation of the OCIExecute (by default) will commit the statement, regardless of what is in the stored procedure.

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I would detest that "feature", unless there were an equivalent call that didn't commit. I guess OP will have to create another procedure in the DB that does the loop processing. –  DCookie Jun 22 '10 at 17:40
    
I use the OCI_DEFAULT option to prevent auto-committing (now called OCI_NO_AUTO_COMMIT in newer versions of PHP). –  aw crud Jun 22 '10 at 18:34
    
@DCookie -Yup, it goes against traditional thinking - first ran across this concept when troubleshooting JDBC code where a similar thing was happening. –  dpbradley Jun 22 '10 at 18:35
    
@Renderln - it sounds like you're doing the right thing with the driver to avoid the commit - I see one of your other comments about swallowing the exception in the application code and can only guess that there's a logic problem in your actual code. –  dpbradley Jun 22 '10 at 18:40
    
@dpbradley so are we all in agreement that Oracle will not roll back a transaction even if a SQL exception bubbles up to the PHP application code? Given that I have autocommit off, this behavior would be explained by DCookie's answer above. –  aw crud Jun 22 '10 at 18:56

Had to do some testing on this recently. When an unhandled exception occurs it seems Oracle does a partial rollback up to the point of the topmost containing begin block or commit for the same session (not always all the way back to the prior commit). Given a table with int id and varchar2 val and proc:

CREATE OR REPLACE PROCEDURE PROC_AUTO_COMMIT_TEST( 
   p_id int, p_val varchar2, p_cmd varchar2
) IS
BEGIN
   if (p_cmd = 'init') then
        delete from TEMP_AUTOCOMMIT_TEST;
        insert into TEMP_AUTOCOMMIT_TEST values(1,'one');
        insert into TEMP_AUTOCOMMIT_TEST values(2,'two');
        insert into TEMP_AUTOCOMMIT_TEST values(3,'three');
        commit;  
   else   
        update TEMP_AUTOCOMMIT_TEST 
           set val = p_val
         where id = p_id;

         if (p_cmd = 'throw') then
            insert into TEMP_AUTOCOMMIT_TEST values(3,'THREE');  -- throws
         end if;
   end if;     
END PROC_AUTO_COMMIT_TEST;

Then executing this:

begin
    PROC_AUTO_COMMIT_TEST(0, null, 'init');   
    begin
        PROC_AUTO_COMMIT_TEST(1, 'ONE', null);
    end;
    begin
        PROC_AUTO_COMMIT_TEST(2, 'TWO', null);
        PROC_AUTO_COMMIT_TEST(3, 'THREE', 'throw');
    end;
end;

rollsback all the way back to the commit within the 'init' (ONE rolled back as well).

Versus excecuting these in order (from either Toad (autocommit off, F9 on each block, f5 for whole thing) or Sqlplus with /'s in between):

begin
    PROC_AUTO_COMMIT_TEST(0, null, 'init');   
end;

begin
    PROC_AUTO_COMMIT_TEST(1, 'ONE', null);
end;

begin
    PROC_AUTO_COMMIT_TEST(2, 'TWO', null);
    PROC_AUTO_COMMIT_TEST(3, 'THREE', 'throw');
end;

The exception ocurring within THREE then rolls back to just after the 'ONE'. However the 'ONE' still needs to either be rolled back or committed since it is holding a row lock (verified with Session Browser in TOAD). Calling this a partial rollback because it doesn't go all the way back to the commit within the 'init' call and leaves a row locked. I am assuming this case is closer to what PHP might be doing and other connectors.

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