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The min algorithm is normally expressed like this:

template <typename T>
const T& min(const T& x, const T& y)
{
    return y < x ? y : x;
}

However, this does not allow constructs of the form min(a, b) = 0. You can achieve that with an additional overload:

template <typename T>
T& min(T& x, T& y)
{
    return y < x ? y : x;
}

What I would like to do is unify these two overloads via perfect forwarding:

template <typename T>
T&& min(T&& x, T&& y)
{
    return y < x ? std::forward<T>(y) : std::forward<T>(x);
}

However, g++ 4.5.0 spits out a warning for min(2, 4) that I return a reference to a temporary. Did I do something wrong?


Okay, I get it. The problem is with the conditional operator. In my first solution, if I call min(2, 4) the conditional operator sees an xvalue and thus moves from the forwarded x to produce a temporary object. Of course it would be dangerous to return that by reference! If I forward the whole expression instead of x and y seperately, the compiler does not complain anymore:

template <typename T>
T&& min(T&& x, T&& y)
{
    return std::forward<T>(y < x ? y : x);
}

Okay, I got rid of the references for arithmetic types :)

#include <type_traits>

template <typename T>
typename std::enable_if<std::is_arithmetic<T>::value, T>::type
min(T x, T y)
{
    return y < x ? y : x;
}

template <typename T>
typename std::enable_if<!std::is_arithmetic<T>::value, T&&>::type
min(T&& x, T&& y)
{
    return std::forward<T>(y < x ? y : x);
}
share|improve this question
    
Hmm it looks to me that the last example creates a temporary too according to the FCD. But this seems odd: It seems to create temporaries for binding a int&& to an int xvalue?! I thought that xvalues are anonymous rvalue refs that can be bound by rvalue references without having temporaries created? The same seems to happen for your revised code, doesn't it? The return type is int&&, and the return expression is an int xvalue. Why doesn't the compiler warn anymore for it? –  Johannes Schaub - litb Jun 23 '10 at 21:14
    
If i read 8.5.3 correctly, it says that this creates an int temporary when binding the reference to the xvalue: int x = 0; int &&rx = (int&&)x; Likewise when using std::move. That can't be the intention, i think. –  Johannes Schaub - litb Jun 23 '10 at 21:24
    
@Johannes: Which part of 8.5.3 are you talking about specifically? –  FredOverflow Jun 23 '10 at 22:32
    
@Fred all the rules :) This time, the very last bullet applies which creates a temporary. –  Johannes Schaub - litb Jun 24 '10 at 9:29
1  
int is not a class type. So for int a temporary is created. I think this is a defect. –  Johannes Schaub - litb Jun 24 '10 at 10:57

2 Answers 2

up vote 3 down vote accepted

It looks to me like you're trying to oversimplify the problem. Unfortunately, getting it entirely correct is decidedly non-trivial. If you haven't read N2199, now would be a good time to do so. Rvalue references continue to evolve, so its reference implementation of min and max probably isn't exactly right anymore, but it should at least be a pretty decent starting point. Warning: the reference implementation is a lot more complex than you're going to like!

share|improve this answer
    
Looks like that proposal was rejected. Any idea why? –  jalf Jun 22 '10 at 17:51
    
@jalf: I suspect people glanced at the reference implementation, and ran away screaming in terror. :-) –  Jerry Coffin Jun 22 '10 at 17:54
    
@Jerry: sounds plausible :) –  jalf Jun 22 '10 at 17:56
    
    
"you're trying to oversimplify the problem" -> I prefer oversimplified problems to overcomplicated solutions :) –  FredOverflow Jun 22 '10 at 21:48

You don't want perfect forwarding, here, you want to return either T& or const T& and never T&&. std::forward is designed for passing one of your parameters along to another function, not for return values.

I think what you want is:

template <typename T>
min(T&& x, T&& y) -> decltype(x)
{
    return y < x ? y : x;
}

EDIT to avoid dangling reference problem:

template <typename T>
struct dedangle { typedef T type; }

template <typename T>
struct dedangle<const T&> { typedef T type; }

template <typename T, typename U>
min(T&& x, U&& y) -> dedangle<decltype(0?y:x)>::type
{
    return y < x ? y : x;
}

// dedangle is re-usable by max, etc, so its cost is amortized
share|improve this answer
    
I'm not exactly sure which type decltype(x) is, but it's either T, which is not at all what I want, or T&&, which is what you say I shouldn't do. Right? –  FredOverflow Jun 22 '10 at 17:47
    
Section 14.8.2.1 [temp.deduct.call] of the standard describes transformations that occur on the arguments of template functions. decltype(x) could easily be int& or const int&, whereas the return type does not undergo this process. Check out example #3 within that section of the standard. –  Ben Voigt Jun 22 '10 at 19:57
    
I disagree, decltype(x) is always the same as T&&. You can convince yourself by inserting the line static_assert(std::is_same<T&&, decltype(x)>::value, "ouch"); into the min function template. –  FredOverflow Jun 22 '10 at 21:45
    
So because the transformation is on T, not the argument T&& x, it does affect the return type after all? What if you go ahead and return T&& but omit std::forward? –  Ben Voigt Jun 22 '10 at 23:12
    
That won't work, because if I call min(2, 4), then T is int&& and, due to reference collapsing rules, T&& is also int&&. So I would try to bind int&& to y < x ? y : x which is an lvalue (because both y and x are, like every formal parameter, lvalues), but rvalue references do not bind to lvalues. –  FredOverflow Jun 23 '10 at 9:37

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