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I want to execute a query in which I rename one of the columns using the 'AS' statement and reuse that aliased column name within the 'WHERE' statement. Below is an example:

SELECT lat AS latitude 
FROM poi_table 
WHERE latitude < 500

The problem here is that SQL Server does not like this query because of the WHERE clause and the AS statement name being referenced in the WHERE clause. Can anyone explain why this is happening and what I can do to remedy my situation?

Suppose I were to have a formula that I have aliased in the SELECT portion of the query, how do I tackle that?

SELECT *, 
( 6371*1000 * acos( cos( radians(42.3936868308) ) * cos( radians( lat ) ) * cos( radians( lon ) - radians(-72.5277256966) ) + sin( radians(42.3936868308) ) * sin( radians( lat ) ) ) ) 
AS distance
FROM poi_table 
WHERE distance < 500;
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5 Answers 5

up vote 13 down vote accepted

SQL doesn't typically allow you to reference column aliases in WHERE, GROUP BY or HAVING clauses. MySQL does support referencing column aliases in the GROUP BY and HAVING, but I stress that it will cause problems when porting such queries to other databases.

When in doubt, use the actual column name:

SELECT t.lat AS latitude 
  FROM poi_table t
 WHERE t.lat < 500

I added a table alias to make it easier to see what is an actual column vs alias.

Update


A computed column, like the one you see here:

SELECT *, 
       ( 6371*1000 * acos( cos( radians(42.3936868308) ) * cos( radians( lat ) ) * cos( radians( lon ) - radians(-72.5277256966) ) + sin( radians(42.3936868308) ) * sin( radians( lat ) ) ) ) AS distance
  FROM poi_table 
 WHERE distance < 500;

...doesn't change that you can not reference a column alias in the WHERE clause. For that query to work, you'd have to use:

SELECT *, 
       ( 6371*1000 * acos( cos( radians(42.3936868308) ) * cos( radians( lat ) ) * cos( radians( lon ) - radians(-72.5277256966) ) + sin( radians(42.3936868308) ) * sin( radians( lat ) ) ) ) AS distance
  FROM poi_table
 WHERE ( 6371*1000 * acos( cos( radians(42.3936868308) ) * cos( radians( lat ) ) * cos( radians( lon ) - radians(-72.5277256966) ) + sin( radians(42.3936868308) ) * sin( radians( lat ) ) ) ) < 500;

Be aware that using a function on a column (IE: RADIANS(lat)) will render an index useless, if one exists on the column.

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I added another (more slightly complex) example. Would your approach of aliasing the table still work? If not, what would I need to do then? –  GobiasKoffi Jun 23 '10 at 15:13
    
@rohanbk: Updated answer based on updated updated question example. –  OMG Ponies Jun 23 '10 at 15:48

SQL Server is tuned to apply the filters before it applies aliases (because that usually produces faster results). You could do a nested select statement. Example:

SELECT Latitude FROM 
(
    SELECT Lat AS Latitude FROM poi_table
) A
WHERE Latitude < 500

I realize this may not be what you are looking for, because it makes your queries much more wordy. A more succinct approach would be to make a view that wraps your underlying table:

CREATE VIEW vPoi_Table AS 
SELECT Lat AS Latitude FROM poi_table

Then you could say:

SELECT Latitude FROM vPoi_Table WHERE Latitude < 500
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1  
Or you could just use sp_rename if you really feel the need to rename the column. –  OMG Ponies Jun 22 '10 at 20:02

I am not sure why you cannot use "lat" but, if you must you can rename the columns in a derived table.

select latitude from (SELECT lat AS latitude FROM poi_table) p where latitude < 500
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This would work on your edited question !

SELECT * FROM (SELECT <Column_List>,  
( 6371*1000 * acos( cos( radians(42.3936868308) ) * cos( radians( lat ) ) * cos( radians( lon ) - radians(-72.5277256966) ) + sin( radians(42.3936868308) ) * sin( radians( lat ) ) ) )  
AS distance 
FROM poi_table) TMP
WHERE distance < 500; 
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Logical Processing Order of the SELECT statement

The following steps show the logical processing order, or binding order, for a SELECT statement. This order determines when the objects defined in one step are made available to the clauses in subsequent steps. For example, if the query processor can bind to (access) the tables or views defined in the FROM clause, these objects and their columns are made available to all subsequent steps. Conversely, because the SELECT clause is step 8, any column aliases or derived columns defined in that clause cannot be referenced by preceding clauses. However, they can be referenced by subsequent clauses such as the ORDER BY clause. Note that the actual physical execution of the statement is determined by the query processor and the order may vary from this list.

  1. FROM
  2. ON
  3. JOIN
  4. WHERE
  5. GROUP BY
  6. WITH CUBE or WITH ROLLUP
  7. HAVING
  8. SELECT
  9. DISTINCT
  10. ORDER BY
  11. TOP

Source: http://msdn.microsoft.com/en-us/library/ms189499%28v=sql.110%29.aspx

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