Stack Overflow is a community of 4.7 million programmers, just like you, helping each other.

Join them; it only takes a minute:

Sign up
Join the Stack Overflow community to:
  1. Ask programming questions
  2. Answer and help your peers
  3. Get recognized for your expertise

I have a question relating to the usage of "this".

Suppose I have two classes A & B; their rough outline is as follows:

class A
{
public:
   ...
   void AddB( B* b )
   {
      // inserts B into the vector v
   }

private:
   std::vector<B*> v;
};

class B
{
public:
   ...

   void foo( void )
   {
      ...

      // Adds itself to the queue held in A
      a.AddB( this );
   }  
};

Is using "this" in this way generally bad practice?

Thank you for your help.

share|improve this question
up vote 9 down vote accepted

No, there's nothing wrong with that, as long as you are careful about ownership and deletion.

share|improve this answer
1  
I might suggest using shared_ptr or something like if your ownership semantics will not include cycles and are also non-trivial. – Omnifarious Jun 22 '10 at 20:04
1  
Agreed. The lifetime management here is the tricky part. – Zan Lynx Jun 22 '10 at 20:05
1  
Using a shared_ptr for this is not trivial. – Ken Bloom Jun 22 '10 at 20:05
3  
@Ken: Introducing boost is maybe not trivial, but using shared_ptr for this is. You add this : enable_shared_from_this after class B. And then you use shared_from_this() – Brian R. Bondy Jun 22 '10 at 20:12
1  
@Brian: lately, I think about shared_ptr as being a std::tr1::shared_ptr, and AFAIK, there's now equivalent to enable_shared_from_this for the std::tr1::shared_ptr. Even so, you can't used shared_from_this in your constructor. – Ken Bloom Jun 22 '10 at 21:28

If you can introduce boost, it's better practice to use boost::shared_ptr instead of direct pointers, because you will eliminate the need to manually free the memory in the right order. And you will eliminate the chance of having dangling pointers that point to already freed memory.

Then you can use shared_from_this() instead of this. It will create a shared pointer instead of a direct pointer for your type. Your type B would derive from enable_shared_from_this.

Your type A would hold a vector of boost::shared_ptr<B> instead of direct pointers.

Here's an example.

share|improve this answer

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.