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I have a java application where the main-thread starts 2 other threads. If one of these threads terminates, the main-thread may start another thread depending on the result of the terminated thread.

Example: The main-thread creates 2 threads: A and B. Thread A will load a picture and thread B will load another picture. If A terminates and loaded the picture successfully a new Thread C will be created which does some other stuff and so on.

How can i do this? I do not want to use busy waiting in the main thread and check every 100ms if one of the two threads has finished. I think i cannot use a thread pool because the number of active threads (in this case A and B) will vary extremely and it's the main-threads dicision to create a new thread or not.

This is rough sketch of the "busy waiting" solution:

public class TestThreads {
 private class MyThread extends Thread {
  volatile boolean done = false;
  int steps;

  @Override
  public void run() {
   for (int i=0; i<steps; i++) {
    System.out.println(Thread.currentThread().getName() + ": " + i);
    try {
     Thread.sleep(1000);
    } catch (InterruptedException exc) {  }
   }
   done = true;
   synchronized (this) {
    notify();
   }
  }

  public void waitFor(long ms) {
   synchronized (this) {
    try {
     wait(ms);
    } catch (InterruptedException exc) {  }    
   }
  }
 }

 public void startTest() {
  MyThread a = new MyThread();
  a.steps = 6;
  a.start();

  MyThread b = new MyThread();
  b.steps = 3;
  b.start();

  while (true) {
   if (!a.done) {
    a.waitFor(100);
    if (a.done) {
     System.out.println("C will be started, because A is done.");
    }
   }

   if (!b.done) {
    b.waitFor(100);
    if (b.done) {
     System.out.println("C will be started, because B is done.");
    }
   }

   if (a.done && b.done) {
    break;
   }
  }
 }

 public static void main(String[] args) {
  TestThreads test = new TestThreads();
  test.startTest();
 }
}
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1  
It should be noted that proper busy waiting isn't a bad approach in all (or most) cases. The sleep in your busy wait makes your "wait much less busy", if you catch my drift, to the point where it is easily a viable alternative. In addition, it's also very clear what is happening by inspection. –  corsiKa Jun 22 '10 at 20:34
    
Can you clarify whether a C task is to launch when B finishes and another C task launches when A finishes, or whether one C task is to launch when the either A or B finishes? –  Pete Kirkham Jun 22 '10 at 20:56
    
OK, i have another example which will be more clearer: The main thread could be a download thread. The threads A and B are two download-slots. Thread A will load the first 50% of the download and thread B the last 50%. After some time thread A terminates because the connection to the download server was lost. The download thread should notice this and create a new thread which will load the parts of the file, that were not loaded by thread A, while thread b is still loading the last 50%. But now the user can say: "Now i want 3 Slots.". So the download-thread should create a 3rd slot-thread. –  Biggie Jun 22 '10 at 21:11
    
While the first two threads are making progress in downloading their parts of the file, the user requests addition of a third "slot-thread". What happens to the first two? –  erickson Jun 22 '10 at 21:53
    
They are still loading, but the number of bytes left of one of the threads is split up into 2 parts. For example thread B needs to load 100 Bytes and the user requests addition of a 3rd slot. Then the number of bytes for thread B is reduced to 50 and a new thread C will be created which loads the other 50 bytes. –  Biggie Jun 22 '10 at 22:02
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5 Answers

up vote 2 down vote accepted

This sounds like a classic case for using a ThreadPoolExecutor for performing the tasks concurrently, and wrapping it with an ExecutorCompletionService, for collecting the results as they arrive.

For example, assuming that tasks contains a set of tasks to execute in parallel, each returning a String value when it terminates, the code to process the results as they become available can be something like:

List<Callable<String>> tasks = ....;
Executor ex = Executors.newFixedThreadPool(10);
ExecutorCompletionService<String> ecs = new ExecutorCompletionService<String>(ex);
for (Callable<String> task : tasks) 
    ecs.submit(task);
for(int i = 0; i < tasks.size(); i++) {
    String result = ecs.take().get();
    //Do something with result
}

If you include the identity of the task as a part of the returned value, then you can make decisions depending on the completion order.

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Check Semaphore

A counting semaphore. Conceptually, a semaphore maintains a set of permits. Each acquire() blocks if necessary until a permit is available, and then takes it

So, whenever you thread finishes, it frees one permit, which is then acquired by the main thread

share|improve this answer
    
Why is this better than pooling? It seems that it just introduces an additional level of complexity (explicit management of resources) which he should not really need to deal with. –  danben Jun 22 '10 at 20:30
    
he said he'd like to avoid them. I didn't say this is a better option though, it's simply an option :) –  Bozho Jun 22 '10 at 20:38
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You should use a thread pool. In a thread pool, you have a fixed number of threads and tasks are kept in a queue; whenever a thread is available, a task is taken off the queue and executed by that thread.

Here is a link to the Sun tutorial on thread pooling.

Edit: just noticed that you wrote in your answer that you think you cannot use thread pooling. I don't see why this is the case. You can set threads to be created on-demand rather than all at once if you are worried about creation overhead, and once created an idle thread is not really going to hurt anything.

You also say that it's the main thread's decision to create a new Thread or not, but does it really need to be? I think that may just overcomplicate things for you.

share|improve this answer
    
-1 it does make sense to use a thread pool rather than creating threads, but then you have exactly the same problem of launching task C when either task A or B completes, which is what the question was about. –  Pete Kirkham Jun 22 '10 at 20:33
    
@Pete Kirkham: Maybe I'm missing something, but I don't see what the problem is. If C hasn't started because we want to limit the number of executing threads, then the ExecutorService takes care of this automatically. If C hasn't started because it depends on the completion of A, then A can add C to the queue before completing. Nothing in the question seems to indicate that C depends on (A or B); it seems like a C happens whenever an A or a B is done. –  danben Jun 22 '10 at 20:37
1  
I read the OP code that the intent was to launch the C task when either A or B finishes. It's not entirely clear; I've asked for clarification. It's also not really the job of a thread pool to control communication between the tasks. –  Pete Kirkham Jun 22 '10 at 20:57
    
Sorry, i missed to mention that C depends on A or B. For example A failed to load the picture, then thread C should load the missing bytes. But thread A should not take care of thread-creation of C. :) Also the number of threads can change. For example the user can increment the number of used threads and then the main-thread should create another thread D. Maybe i need to read the articles about Thread Pools again :) –  Biggie Jun 22 '10 at 21:04
    
@Pete Kirkham: from this last comment and the one above it sounds like there can be multiple Cs. Regardless, notice that I didn't suggest that the thread pool should be controlling communication between tasks - this would be the job of the workflow, and that certainly does not preclude the use of a pool. –  danben Jun 22 '10 at 21:21
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Is there a reason to control the thread execution directly instead of using something like ExecutorService?

@danben got there first, but I fell into the same pooling trap.

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A lot of the complexity in your code is that the main thread is trying to wait on two different objects. There's nothing which says you can't use wait and notify on another object, and if your tasks are ( A or B ) then C, the code below will work - wait on a reference which is set to indicate the first task to complete.

import java.util.*;
import java.util.concurrent.*;
import java.util.concurrent.atomic.*;

public class BiggieThreads
{
    private static class MyTask implements Runnable
    {
        final int steps;
        final AtomicReference<MyTask> shared;
        final String name;

        MyTask ( int steps, AtomicReference<MyTask> shared, String name )
        {
            this.shared = shared;
            this.steps = steps;
            this.name = name;
        }

        @Override
        public void run()
        {
            for ( int i = 1; i <= steps; i++ ) {
                System.out.println ( "Running: " + this  + " " + i + "/" + steps);
                try {
                    Thread.sleep ( 100 );
                } catch ( InterruptedException exc ) {  }
            }

            // notify if this is the first to complete
            if ( shared.compareAndSet ( null, this ) )
                synchronized ( shared ) {
                    shared.notify();
                }

            System.out.println ( "Completed: " + this );
        }

        @Override
        public String toString ()
        {
            return name;
        }
    }

    public void startTest() throws InterruptedException
    {
        final ExecutorService pool = Executors.newFixedThreadPool ( 3 );
        final AtomicReference<MyTask> shared = new AtomicReference<MyTask>();

        Random random = new Random();

        synchronized ( shared ) {
            // tasks launched while lock on shared held to prevent
            // them notifying before this thread waits
            pool.execute ( new MyTask ( random.nextInt ( 5 ) + 3, shared, "a" ) );
            pool.execute ( new MyTask ( random.nextInt ( 5 ) + 3, shared, "b" ) );

            shared.wait();
        }

        System.out.println ( "Reported: " + shared.get() );

        pool.shutdown();
    }

    public static void main ( String[] args ) throws InterruptedException
    {
        BiggieThreads test = new BiggieThreads ();
        test.startTest();
    }
}

I'd tend to use a semaphore for this job in production, as although the wait is quite simple, using in semaphore puts a name to the behaviour, so there's less to work out when you next read the code.

share|improve this answer
    
Then the new thread C should be created in the synchronized block after the wait-statement? But i think it is not possible to increment the number of parallel threads of the thread pool at runtime, right? –  Biggie Jun 22 '10 at 21:46
    
@Biggie It doesn't have to be within the block unless it also cares about notifying the shared object. You shouldn't really care about limiting the number of threads; use a newCachedThreadPool and limit the number of active download tasks instead. –  Pete Kirkham Jun 22 '10 at 22:00
    
In your code outside the block, shared.get() will be printed. But what happens if both thread A and B will notify one after another just before the get() will be called? E.G. the download in A fails and A and B will notify. Then i could miss that A failes and could not load the last bytes. In this case i need to put that code into the block, right? newCachedThreadPool sounds good. THX –  Biggie Jun 22 '10 at 22:17
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