Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

If I want to add a list of values as an HTTP Header, is there a standard way to do this? I couldn't find anything (that I could easily understand) in RFC 822. For example, is comma separated values standard or semi-colon separated values. Is there a standard at all?

Example:

Key: value1;value2;value3
share|improve this question

1 Answer 1

up vote 27 down vote accepted

You'll want to take a look at the HTTP spec RFC 2616 where it says:

Multiple message-header fields with the same field-name MAY be present in a message if and only if the entire field-value for that header field is defined as a comma-separated list [i.e., #(values)]. It MUST be possible to combine the multiple header fields into one "field-name: field-value" pair, without changing the semantics of the message, by appending each subsequent field-value to the first, each separated by a comma. The order in which header fields with the same field-name are received is therefore significant to the interpretation of the combined field value, and thus a proxy MUST NOT change the order of these field values when a message is forwarded.

What this means is that you can send the same header multiple times in a response with different values, as long as those values can be appended to each other using a comma. This also means that you can send multiple values in a single header by concatenating them with commas.

So in your case it will be:

Key: value1,value2,value3
share|improve this answer
1  
you can send the same header multiple times in a response with different values if and only if the entire field-value for that header field is defined as a comma-separated list. I think this refers to the fact that not all headers are allowed to be a set of values. For example, the Content-Length must be a single value. –  Cheeso Aug 10 '13 at 20:39

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.