Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

if you are calculating the normals of a polygon for rendering it on WebGL, do you use a normal for every index in the index array or for every vertex on the vertex array?

share|improve this question

2 Answers 2

up vote 1 down vote accepted

Every vertex. A vertex, in the WebGL sense (which is the same as OpenGL ES and other predecessors), isn't really a point in space, but rather a combination of attributes. One of these is almost always the location (though in unusual cases you might not have that), and others are generally things like the normal vector, the colour, the texture coordinates, and so on.

The index array, by contrast, is an offset into the vertex attribute arrays. So when you specify index (say) 1 in an index array, it's shorthand for "the vertex made of combining the first location in the location buffer, the first normal in the normal buffer, the first colour in the colour buffer, and the first texture coordinate in the texture coordinate buffer".

The most counter-intuitive thing for me when learning this was separating vertices from the locations they happen to occupy. There's no reason why two vertices can't have the same location.

share|improve this answer
    
I think I solved this already but just to close the discussion... Ok so in other words, the index retrieves whatever information you have in the other buffers: color, normals, texture, etc. So you define all of these on vertex space. Thanks Giles. –  Diego Mar 21 '11 at 18:21
    
Yup, that's right. Index zero refers to the zeroth element in all of those buffers. –  Giles Thomas Mar 21 '11 at 19:44

In the notes here, the user is calculating them for each vertex.

share|improve this answer

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.