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Why is System.Version in .NET defined as Major.Minor.Build.Revision? Almost everyone (including me) seems to agree that revision belongs in third place, and "build" or whatever you'd like to call it belongs last.

Does Microsoft even use the numbers in this haphazard way, e.g. 3.5.3858.2, or are the names themselves just backwards? For example if you were to write your own Version class with the order Major.Minor.Build.Revision, would it be proper to swap the last two components when converting to a System.Version, or do you ignore it and just pretend the names are backwards?

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This is the most inspired question I've seen today... I've always wanted to know this and never thought to ask! –  codekaizen Jun 23 '10 at 0:36

3 Answers 3

up vote 15 down vote accepted

I think the confusion comes what most consider a "revision" and what Microsoft does:

  • Build: A difference in build number represents a recompilation of the same source. This would be appropriate because of processor, platform, or compiler changes.

  • Revision: Assemblies with the same name, major, and minor version numbers but different revisions are intended to be fully interchangeable. This would be appropriate to fix a security hole in a previously released assembly.

The security fix angle, probably much more common for them, seems to be a decent reason to have it in last place, as the "most-minor" change.

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That makes sense. But with your own version class using the order major.minor.revision.build, would it be proper to swap the last two components when converting to a .NET System.Version? Or leave them alone and let them be called by opposite names in each structure? –  Jake Petroules Jun 23 '10 at 1:31
    
@Jake - Up to each person doing the build I suppose...personally I do swap them, my convention is actually Major.Minor.Revision.ChangeSet, so I can get the exact code running our of source control just by glancing at the number. Since we do continuous integration, changeset and build number being synonymous for us made sense...not sure that works everywhere though. –  Nick Craver Jun 23 '10 at 1:37

I realize I'm coming to the party a bit late, but I wanted to share my twopence on why the order of build and revision are "wrong." It's not so much that they're in the wrong order, but that they're not in any order.

The version of an assembly, when it comes down to it, is Major.Minor. From the aforementioned link, Microsoft says, "Subsequent versions of an assembly that differ only by build or revision numbers are considered to be Hotfix updates of the prior version." [My emphasis]

The Build represents a recompilation of the same source. The Revision represents a code change, but one that is fully interchangable with other revisions of the same [Major.Minor] version. But neither takes precedence over the other.

So, in summary, don't think of it as:

+ Major
|
+-+ Minor
  |
  +-+ Build
    |
    +-+ Revision

But instead:

+ Major
|
+-+ Minor
  |
  +-+ Build
  |
  +-+ Revision
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Does Microsoft even use the numbers in this haphazard way, e.g. 3.5.3858.2

If you let it default, e.g. by specifying [assembly: AssemblyVersion("1.1.*")], then the third number increments each day, and the fourth number is a random number (to disambiguate if there's more than one builds in a single day).

Almost everyone (including me) seems to agree that revision belongs in third place, and "build" or whatever you'd like to call it belongs last.

Microsoft seem to be using "build" as a synonym of "day": perhaps that's related to the idea of "daily builds"; and a "revision" is then therefore another version of the (daily) build.

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Not really what the question is asking. He's not asking what they are, but why are they are in this particular order. –  Alastair Pitts Jun 23 '10 at 1:01
    
@Alastair Pitts - I've added to my answer to try to address that. –  ChrisW Jun 23 '10 at 1:08
    
I've amended my downvote. :) –  Alastair Pitts Jun 23 '10 at 1:41
2  
The revision number isn't random. It's the number of seconds since midnight, divided by two. –  Daniel Dec 19 '12 at 0:06

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