Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I am trying to create a somewhat complex relationship in Rails, and am having some trouble finding the best way to do so. I have a Users table in which each user acts as a teacher and a student. I would like to have a has_many "students" (which are also just Users) and a has_many "teachers" (which are also just Users). I do not want to do any subclassing or single table inheritance. I just want two different many_to_many's between Users. What is the best way to do this? Is this a bad idea to do? Is there a better solution?

share|improve this question
1  
This is not a bad idea, and you would follow the standard stuff for many-to-many but use the same class instead of a different one. There is a modifier for the relationship called :class_name or :class. –  Yar Jun 23 '10 at 2:05

1 Answer 1

up vote 4 down vote accepted

you should be able to setup an assignment model and use it as you would any other many-to-many relationship:

class User < ActiveRecord::Base
  has_many :student_teacher_assignments, :class_name => "StudentTeacherAssignment", :foreign_key => "student_id"
  has_many :teachers, :through => :student_teacher_assignments
  has_many :teacher_student_assignments, :class_name => "StudentTeacherAssignment", :foreign_key => "teacher_id"
  has_many :students, :through => :teacher_student_assignments
end

class StudentTeacherAssignment < ActiveRecord::Base
  belongs_to :student, :class_name => "User"
  belongs_to :teacher, :class_name => "User"
end

I would change the names of the assignments to be a little less similar and more meaningful, but the concept should remain the same

share|improve this answer
    
Ahhh, Thats pretty much what I was trying to do, but I was getting it slightly wrong. This works great. Thanks! –  Joe Cannatti Jun 23 '10 at 2:21

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.