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I'm a starter in WPF, and there's something I can't seem to figure out.

I have a CheckBox that I would like to disable when a RadioButton is not selected. My current syntax is:

<CheckBox IsEnabled="{Binding ElementName=rbBoth, Path=IsChecked}">Show all</CheckBox>

So basically, I want IsEnabled to take the opposite value than the binding expression I'm currently supplying.

How can I do this? Thanks.

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2 Answers 2

up vote 12 down vote accepted

You need to use what's called a value converter (a class that implements IValueConverter.) A very basic example of such a class is shown below. (Watch for clipping...)

public class NegateConverter : IValueConverter
{

    public object Convert( object value, Type targetType, object parameter, CultureInfo culture )
    {
        if ( value is bool ) {
            return !(bool)value;
        }
        return value;
    }

    public object ConvertBack( object value, Type targetType, object parameter, CultureInfo culture )
    {
        if ( value is bool ) {
            return !(bool)value;
        }
        return value;
    }

}

Then to include it in your XAML you would do something like:

<UserControl xmlns:local="clr-namespace:MyNamespace">
    <UserControl.Resources>
        <local:NegateConverter x:Key="negate" />
    </UserControl.Resources>

    ...
    <CheckBox IsEnabled="{Binding IsChecked, ElementName=rbBoth, Converter={StaticResource negate}}"
              Content="Show all" />

</UserControl>
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Yeah... I thought about that, but I was trying to see if there's a more direct approach. –  SiN Jun 23 '10 at 6:52
2  
As you use WPF more and more you'll find that you create a pretty sophisticated set of converters and the design of them is typically very reusable. In fact, I do have a NegateConverter but it's much more robust than my example. It negates numerics, booleans, Visibility, Thickness, etc. Just one of about a dozen converters I use frequently. –  Josh Jun 23 '10 at 6:55
    
Josh: How do you negate a Thickness? –  Gabe Jun 23 '10 at 7:10
    
var thickness2 = new Thickness(-t1.Left, -t1.Top, -t1.Right, -t1.Bottom); –  Josh Jun 23 '10 at 7:22
2  
Here actually I just blogged about it... josheinstein.com/blog/index.php/2010/06/… –  Josh Jun 23 '10 at 7:32

Your current syntax already serves your need. It will disable the checkbox if the radiobutton is not checked.

If you really want to invert the scenario, all you need is a Converter. Take a look at this sample.

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