Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

This syntax was used as a part of an answer to this question:

template <bool>
struct static_assert;

template <>
struct static_assert<true> {}; // only true is defined

#define STATIC_ASSERT(x) static_assert<(x)>()

I do not understand that syntax. How does it work?

Suppose I do

STATIC_ASSERT(true);

it gets converted to

static_assert<true>();

Now what?

share|improve this question
    
:​​​​​​​​​​​​​) –  GManNickG Jun 23 '10 at 8:07

4 Answers 4

up vote 11 down vote accepted
STATIC_ASSERT(true);

indeed means

static_assert<true>();

which evaluates to nothing. static_assert<true> is just an empty structure without any members. static_assert<true>() creates an object of that structure and does not store it anywhere.

This simply compiles and does nothing.

On the other hand

STATIC_ASSERT(false);

means

static_assert<false>();

which results in compilation error. static_assert has no specialization for false. So a general form is used. But the general form is given as follows:

template <bool>
struct static_assert;

which is just a declaration of a structure and not its definition. So static_assert<false>() causes compilation error as it tries to make an object of a structure which is not defined.

share|improve this answer
    
+1 Excellent explanation –  fingerprint211b Jun 23 '10 at 10:22

static_assert<true>(); makes that

template <>
struct static_assert<true> {}

templated struct specialization temporary object creation being done - a call to constructor and later to a destructor that both will be hopefully eliminated by the optimizer since they do nothing. Since there's only a specialization for true and no generic version of the template struct all constructs that evaluate to static_assert<false>(); will just not compile.

share|improve this answer
    
Thank you for the explanation, i too found myself lost in this syntax. –  PeterK Jun 23 '10 at 7:02

In the expression

static_assert<true>();

since static_assert<true> is a type, it will call the constructor of static_assert<true>. As static_assert<true> is specialized to an empty struct, nothing will be affected.


However, in

static_assert<false>();

as there is no specialization for static_assert<false>, the generic definition

template <bool>
struct static_assert;

will be used. But here, the type static_assert<B> is incomplete. So calling constructor of static_assert<B> will result in compilation error.


Therefore, this is called "static assert" as the statement will abort the compilation if the expression evaluates to false, similar to the normal assert() function that will kill the program in runtime.

share|improve this answer

Well, I guess it is about template specialization. STATIC_ASSERT(true) will compile successfully, because there is a definition (not just a declaration) of "static_assert< true >".

STATIC_ASSERT(false) will be rejected by the compiler, because there is only a declaration for "static_assert< false >" and no definition.

Update: for visual studio, STATIC_ASSERT(true) is ok, but STATIC_ASSERT(false) triggers the error: "error C2514: 'static_assert<__formal>' : class has no constructors [ with __formal = false ]"

share|improve this answer

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.