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I have many .cs files and I want to retrieve the method behind the [AcceptVerbs(HttpVerbs.Post)] attribute from these files automatically.

so input is:

[AcceptVerbs(HttpVerbs.Post)]
public ActionResult sample(string msg)
{......}

and output is:

public ActionResult sample(string msg)
{......}

My idea is use the RegularExpressions and String.IndexOf find the attribute's location and count the { and } to find the method start and end location in order to retrieve the method.

Are there other ways can help me (libraries, tools, or method)?

Thanks a lot.

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With the body, or just the declaration? – MaLio Jun 23 '10 at 9:51

Not sure if this is what you want, but you can use reflection

public static IList<MemberInfo> GetMethodsImplementing<T>(Assembly assembly) where T : Attribute
{
    var result = new List<MemberInfo>();

    var types = assembly.GetTypes();
    foreach (var type in types)
    {
        if (!type.IsClass) continue;

        var members = type.GetMembers();
        foreach (var member in members)
        {
            if (member.MemberType != MemberTypes.Method)
                continue;

            var attributes = member.GetCustomAttributes(typeof(T), true /*inherit*/);
            if (attributes.Length > 0)
            {
                // yup. This method implementes MyAttribute
                result.Add(member);
            }
        }
    }

    return result;
}
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Assuming this is just a one time thing and your source is "balanced" (equal amount of { and } in your sourcefiles) you can use Regex balancing for it.

This snippet just takes a file and checks inside it for any .. class .. { .. } and returns them as String[].

You'll have to modify it to match AcceptVerbs(HttpVerbs.Post) in the linq query at the end. Recursing through your directory and doing this for each .cs file I assume you have code for. finally you might also have to modify it a bit and use rx more/fewer times depending on the level of {} you want to start looking in.

This test snippet was made in LinqPad you can download it and test it by setting Language to C# Program, moving it to a console app that prints into a file or similar instead should be simple though.

void Main()
{
    String data = String.Empty;
    using (StreamReader reader = new StreamReader(@"/path/to/a/file.cs"))
        data = reader.ReadToEnd();

    CheckContents(data, "class").Dump();
}

// Define other methods and classes here
String[] CheckContents(String data, String pattern)
{
    var rx = new Regex(@"{
    (?>
        { (?<DEPTH> )
        |
        } (?<-DEPTH> )
        |
        [^}{]*
    )*
    (?(DEPTH)(?!))
    }", RegexOptions.IgnorePatternWhitespace | RegexOptions.Multiline);

    var rx2 = new Regex(@"[^{]*{
    (?>
        { (?<DEPTH> )
        |
        } (?<-DEPTH> )
        |
        [^}{]*
    )*
    (?(DEPTH)(?!))
    }", RegexOptions.IgnorePatternWhitespace | RegexOptions.Multiline);

    var nameSpace = rx.Match(data).Value.Substring(1); // Remove { from namespace so we don't match the same thing over and over
    var parts = rx2.Matches(nameSpace);

    return (from Match part in parts where Regex.IsMatch(part.Value, pattern) select part.Value.Trim()).ToArray();
}
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