Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

This sounds like it should be simple to do but not so! There is no Oracle (meta-data) view that I can find that gives the underlying column and table name for an Oracle view column. The only way I have found of doing it is to parse the view source SQL (which is far from and exact science).

Just to explain what I want, consider the following example view which I created in SCOTT schema:

CREATE OR REPLACE VIEW EMP_DEP
(
   EMPLOYEE_NAME,
   DEPARTMENT_NAME
)
AS
SELECT 
   ENAME,
   DNAME 
FROM
   emp a,
   dept b
WHERE
   a.deptno= b.deptno
/

Now given the view and column name EMP_DEP.DEPARTMENT_NAME, I would like to get the underlying table and column name used by the view which is DEPT.DNAME. Does anyone know of a way to get this information that does not involve parsing the view's SQL?

share|improve this question
add comment

6 Answers

There isn't a way, because the definition of each view column is an expression, not (in general) merely a table column. For example, your view's SQL could be:

SELECT 
   UPPER(ENAME) || 'xxx',
   myfunction(DNAME)
FROM
   emp a,
   dept b
WHERE
   a.deptno= b.deptno

or perhaps

SELECT ename || 'xxx', dname
FROM (
  SELECT 
     UPPER(ENAME) AS ename,
     myfunction(DNAME) AS dname
  FROM
     emp a,
     dept b
  WHERE
     a.deptno= b.deptno
)

What would you expect to see for the "underlying columns" in this example?

share|improve this answer
    
True (and I was aware of this). In this case it should just return nothing because its an expression. –  VinceJS Jun 23 '10 at 11:31
    
It would be nice if some dependencies query would return emp.ename and dept.dname, making it easier to identify where changes to the underlying table/column would affect a view/procedure/etc.... but TOAD provides a lot of that information on the "used by" tab, so at least it's easy to check manually. –  Mark Baker Jun 23 '10 at 17:37
add comment

In 11g Oracle introduced finer grained dependency tracking. So the database knows which table columns a view or package body depends on. However, they don't seem to have exposed this data in a view. But there may be x$ tables with the info.

share|improve this answer
add comment

The sql that defined the view can be found in all_views

set long 9999 
select TEXT from all_views where VIEW_NAME='MYVIEW';

This is the only way to get at the underlying tables and columns.

share|improve this answer
add comment

The linked procedures may be of some help for identifying dependencies

The DBA_DEPENDENCIES View will give you a list of the tables that a View is based on:

SELECT *
  FROM DBA_DEPENDENCIES
 WHERE OWNER = <Schema>
   AND NAME = <View_Name>
   AND TYPE = 'VIEW'
share|improve this answer
add comment

Tables used to created the view can be selected using the query:

select 
  name , 
  type , 
  referenced_name , 
  referenced_type
from 
  user_dependencies 
where 
  name = 'VIEW_NAME' and 
  type = 'VIEW' and  
  referenced_type = 'TABLE';

If view columns have the same column name of table column, then please try the below query:

select 
  distinct table_name, column_name 
from 
  all_tab_columns 
where table_name in (select
                        referenced_name
                      from 
                        user_dependencies 
                      where 
                        name = 'VIEW_NAME' and 
                        type = 'VIEW' and  
                        referenced_type = 'TABLE') 
 and column_name in (select 
                        column_name 
                     from 
                        all_tab_columns 
                     where 
                        table_name = 'VIEW_NAME');
share|improve this answer
add comment

Since the requester is looking for any instance of his table, and not with respect to a specific view, I would recommend:

SELECT *
  FROM DBA_DEPENDENCIES
 WHERE TYPE = 'VIEW'
   AND REFERENCED_TYPE = 'TABLE'
   AND REFERENCED_NAME = '<TABLE_NAME>'
share|improve this answer
add comment

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.